Vol. IV No. 48 - Saturday November 26 - December 2, 2005
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LETTERS
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Exotic Buffet?

Thank you from the Red Cross

Shocking and Disgusting!

No electric due to the Night safari?

Boycott Night Safari

Runners without care

Paying for college for international students

Exotic Buffet?

Editor;

Although I had mixed feelings on the concept of importing wild animals from Kenya to support the new night safari venture, I had more or less persuaded myself that the new attraction would be worth the experience, and worthy of support when I visit Chiang Mai in January, given the aims of conservation and education that had come through clearly enough in the advance publicity.

But a report in ‘The Nation’ of 17th November that “Visitors to the park’s Vareekunchorn restaurant will have the option of tucking in to an “Exotic Buffet” of tiger, lion, elephant and giraffe, for just B. 4,500 a head” is decidedly unpalatable! The seriously mixed messages that this hair-brained idea sends out will simply serve to confirm the wildlife lobby’s worst fears that the whole venture is nothing more than naked commercialism. If this report is true (you don’t have an ‘April Fools’ Day in November do you?) then I for one cannot possibly support the venture and will have to give the night safari the thumbs down in favor of ‘eine kleine nacht musik’ at the Riverside.

David Fallows, Seann Dachaidh, Scotland


Thank you from the Red Cross

Dear Chiangmai Mail Editor,

After our campaign when the Red Cross Committee asked all magazines and newspapers in Chiang Mai to assist in publicizing information in regards to blood donation to have sufficient blood for treating patients in Chiang Mai and nearby provinces, we are happy to announce that the cooperation we received was tremendous.

On this occasion, Chiang Mai Red Cross would like to thank you for publicizing the above event. We pray to Buddha and all sacred things in Chiang Mai to protect you, your family, and all staff from all harm and wish you happy, progressive, have a good health, and achieve whatever you wish.
Ornadda Tantipat
Chiang Mai Red Cross President


Shocking and Disgusting!

Dear Sir,

I have read an article in the newspaper this morning that a zoo in Chiang Mai is actually serving up animals such as giraffes and crocodiles in its restaurant.

Although I have heard that Thailand has a bad reputation regarding the treatment of animals, I don’t know whether to believe this story.

However, if it IS true I think someone really needs to call a halt to it extremely quickly or it will kill your tourist industry stone dead. I - and many other people - wouldn’t dream of visiting a country which engages in such barbarity.

It’s bad enough to imprison animals which belong in the wild - what right does anyone have to do that? But then to eat them as well! I think that anyone guilty of that isn’t fit to be called a human being.
Gary Kingsbury


No electric due to the Night safari?

Dear Editor,

Are Night Safari Park and our electricity cuts related in any way? These last two years we have had only “natural” electricity cuts in Chiangmai Lake Land on Canal Road during or after heavy rains or storms. I read in the Chiangmai Mail that on 16 November, the Prime Minister introduced the Night Safari Park to 200 Thai businessmen. ‘Coincidentally’, on that same day, the electricity was cut for several hours. The same thing happened a few days earlier, which I suppose coincided with the time when the officials were practicing this presentation. If Night Safari Park is to open on 1 January, will this mean that we will have the same electricity cuts every day when the park officials are using their lights? Or have they included a sufficient amount of their monster budget of 1.16 Billion Thai Baht to prevent such a situation?

A reader from Lake Land


Boycott Night Safari

Dear Editor,

I want to urge all foreign residents of Thailand and all justice-minded friends to boycott the Night Safari as long as the safari managers charge “250 baht for adults and 400 baht for foreigners,” for tickets to the wildlife zones as stated in your November 19 issue. Many long-term alien residents of Thailand receive Thai salaries and pay Thai taxes. They already support the National Parks service by paying ten times the Thai price for entry to Thai national parks. A policy of determining price by skin-color (will Asian aliens be questioned about their nationality?) is unfair and unfriendly. Tourists are left with a bad taste in their mouths when prices are set by prejudice.

AJ George,
Chiang Mai resident


Runners without care

To the Editor,

On November 12 there was some kind of jogging event in the neighborhood of Mae Rim; the villages of Ban Hong Nok and Mae Ram. I don’t know who the organizers or the runners were. However, evidence of their outing came to my attention when I went on my own daily walks in this area a couple of days later. All along the roadside of these villages are mounds of paper ribbons. I don’t know what purpose they were meant to serve but surely a more eco-conscious solution could be found. I hope that next time this group comes through I will not know about it because they will have left ‘nothing but footprints....’ and acted more mindful of keeping the environment in the state which attracted them to the area in the first place.

Environmentally Concerned Resident


Paying for college for international students

To the editor:

After reading CMIS College Counselor Jon Hartmann’s advice on “Paying for college for international students” in your November 19 issue, I wanted to add my comments about U.S. educational opportunities.

Because Mr. Hartmann stated that “U.S. education is the most expensive in the world”, let me first address the issue of money. If price is a student’s main concern, I hope that college counselors explain that some of the most expensive U.S. schools are also the ones most likely to provide scholarships. Several of the top U.S. universities even have a policy of providing full scholarships to qualified students in financial need.

On the other end of the financial scale, U.S. community colleges offer a low-cost alternative for international students and many have agreements with four-year institutions to accept community college credits. More information about this alternative is available from the IC-ACE educational advising center at Chiang Mai University’s International Center.

The fact is that more than 500,000 international students from around the world are furthering their education in the United States. Here are some of the reasons:

Quality: U.S. colleges are known worldwide for the quality of their facilities, resources, and faculty. Accreditation systems ensure that institutions continue to maintain these standards.

Choice: The U.S. education system is unrivalled worldwide in the choice it offers of types of institutions, academic and social environments, entry requirements, degree programs, and subjects in which you can specialize.

Value: As an investment in your future, a U.S. degree offers excellent value for the money. A wide range of tuition fees and living costs, plus some financial help from colleges, have made study in the United States affordable for thousands of students.

Flexibility: One of the most distinctive features of U.S. universities and colleges is the flexibility in choice of courses within a college or university, but more importantly there is also the option for students to move between one institution and another. Completing the first two years of a degree at one institution, usually a community college, and then moving to another, is very common.

Beatrice Camp
U.S. Consul General Chiang Mai



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