LETTERS
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Winter Fair worries

Enjoys the news from home

Supertramp-crime of the century

Handicapped Parking spaces reserved for delivery trucks?

Arguments for and against so-called ‘People Power’

Winter Fair worries

Dear Editor,

The Chiang Mai Winter Fair is over for another year, and the thousands of local
residents living within the immediate area must have breathed a sigh of relief on that final evening. Of all celebrations staged in Asia, this increasingly unsophisticated annual fair in Thailand must rank highly for negative cultural value, and gross vulgarity, with deafening performances of pop singers and rock bands. This foreseeably attracts large numbers of teenagers, a number of whom are hooligans, or members of rival gangs. Not an ideal or a desirable audience.

This “cultural event” is therefore downgraded to a category of nightly noise pollution, with stadium-size speakers blasting out “music” which can be heard over a wide area, obliging everybody to endure the torment until 1 a.m., including schoolchildren and all others who have to rise early next morning. This, let me emphasize, continues every night for almost two weeks.

The noise at times was sufficient to spoil a normal telephone conversation, or drown out a television set in residential areas up to 2 km away. The level at source therefore was probably in excess of 120 decibels, and potentially injurious to those attending. To add to the problem, a number of bombs were thrown by hoodlums on two separate evenings, resulting in numerous injuries. So, wherein lies the “culture” here?

Before we repeat the folly once more, may I on behalf of the many who share this opinion, respectfully recommend that the Governor and the Mayor review the content of the 2006/7 Winter Fair with a view to transforming it into a safe, dignified and joyous festival that reflects the best of Lanna Thai - not something we should be ashamed of. Nobody wants to spoil youthful enjoyment, but in fairness, let the younger ones enjoy rock concerts in a soundproof environment.

Beatrice Clement


Enjoys the news from home

Dear Chiangmai Mai,

Even though I study in the US now, I still enjoy my weekly Chiangmai Mail.

Pattana Lee

Pattana Lee, graduate of Montfort College, now a freshman at
Santa Monica College, California, and awarded on the Dean’s Acade-
mic List after earning straight As in Fall 2005 semester.


Supertramp-crime of the century

Dear Mott the dog,

I am a fan of your page in the Chiangmai Mail. May I answer your question regarding Sam and the repay for his financial backing of the band Supertramp. Yes, he became a millionaire as the band gave him a percentage of ticket sales for their concert tours.

I was the personal tour manager of Roger Hodgson on their last big tour together. After this giant tour Roger Hodgson left the band,
telling the crowds in the
stadiums that sometimes a change is good, then performing his famous song “give a little bit” alone on the stage with his acoustic guitar. Tears were running in the stadiums. It was very emotional for everybody including myself and the total crew on the road.

The band was managed by Kenny Thompson, brother of bass player Doogie Thompson and Dave Magereson who also managed Chris de Burgh of Ireland.

The main reason for the split of the band was problems with the shares of royalties for the publishing and sales of the records and songs. Mainly all big hits of Supertramp were the songs written and composed by Roger Hodgson. Not to forget his dominant voice identifying the Supertramp style.

The sax man John Helliwell never left the band while the remaining members were trying to keep going as a band. It was never again successful.

A long friendship has grown between me and Roger who is a big cricket fan. If possible, I would like to convince him to visit the Chiang Mai cricket sixes one year and support the tournament and gymkhana club on a stage with “give a little bit”.

“Gipsy” Eckard Schuette


Handicapped Parking spaces reserved for delivery trucks?

Dear Editor,

On Monday, January 30, 2006 at approximately 10.15 p.m., an S & P delivery truck pulled up to the handicap parking place at the Rimping Super Market Chotana Branch. The space was blocked by the usual barrier to remind people that it is for those who have difficulty moving about. The driver blew the horn on the delivery truck and one of the employees in the lot moved the barrier
and the S & P delivery truck parked.

I had just placed my purchases in my van and went over to the driver and pointed out that he was parked in a place reserved for handicapped. I had to speak in English because I do not speak Thai. He ignored me as did the helper who was unloading the S & P products. I went into the S & P restaurant and asked to see the manager who came right up. He saw the truck parked in the handicapped space and knew what I was about to say. He spoke English and not only understood me but also knew that the delivery truck was wrongly parked. But he made absolutely no attempt to move the delivery truck. He said to me, “Five minutes.”

The S & P Company has been around for many years. I remember having lunch in the small restaurant on Thapae Road 15 years ago. S & P has grown in many ways - except one, it seems, civic minded-
ness. The personnel manager should be ashamed to have drivers in the trucks who are so unmindful of today’s thoughtfulness extended to the handicapped by most of society. I shall never buy another S & P product nor eat in one of its
restaurants ever again.

HCG Chiang Mai


Arguments for and against so-called ‘People Power’

Dear Editor,

In last week’s edition, the caption under the picture of free trade protestors contained the words “people power.” That’s propaganda. It is by no means always true that the interests of the
common person is always aligned with the interests of free trade protestors. We need to analyze the issues at hand, on a case by case basis. For example, if the people, even the poorest among us, have to pay
more for rice, cloth, or milk because the producers in those industries lobbied to have their goods ‘protected’ from competition, whose interests does that serve? On the other hand, some of the particular points of these protestors might be legitimately valid. And the agreement itself might contain regulations or fine print that do more to hinder than help the availability of cheaper goods for the common consumer. But we won’t get closer to the facts of the matter by throwing around a priori assumptions that don’t always hold up under closer analysis.

Doug McCann Chiang Mai