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HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

A Thai woman reaches the age of 109 in San Sai, Chiang Mai

Dengue Fever – again and again and again!

Discover Japan through contemporary posters

Far Eastern College upgrades to University

Commemorative bag sales to benefit charity

A Thai woman reaches the age of 109 in San Sai, Chiang Mai

Chiangmai Mail visiting Noi Karn-ngern, 109, a healthy elder living in San Sai, Chiang Mai.

Saksit Meesubkwang
Having heard of an elderly woman achieving the magnificent age of 109, our Chiangmai Mail reporter accompanied by Assoc. Prof. Dr. Anuwat Pheng-oun, lecturer of Maejo University visited the super-centenarian at Baan Pong Village.
Noi Karn-ngern said that she had seven children, but five had passed away. She could not read, she said, because when she was young there were no schools. She has not seen a doctor for 20 years and she ate her favorite food every day made from chilli paste, vegetables and fruit for each meal.
She spoke about her daily life and said that after getting up, she likes to keep abreast of current events by listening to the radio. Her favorite programs are the news and Buddhist teachings. She also likes to chant and meditate every morning and evening, for two hours. She never takes life too seriously and keeps an open mind about most things.
She prefers to live alone and has done so for 30 years. Her children often visit her and take along her favorite foods and fruit for her, but the old lady protested that she just did not want to put anyone to any trouble or do things she was perfectly capable of doing herself. She looked remarkably healthy even though she was 109 years old; and appeared stronger and more vigorous than some 70-80 year-olds, and is still able to walk unaided without any outward signs of pain.


Dengue Fever – again and again and again!

Staff Reporters
Despite my pleas, (and those of the Public Health Department), Dengue Fever and its potentially fatal variant, Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is still with us. The latest figures have now prompted me to repeat my advice on this subject. If you remember reading about it before, I apologize, but the subject matter is very important. This is an important ailment, that can be avoided.
However, first you should understand a little more about Dengue. It was first described in 1780 by a Benjamin Rush in Philadelphia (so it didn’t start here), when the name Break Bone Fever was applied, with the symptoms of pain in the bones and rise in temperature. The name “Dengue” came in 1828 during an epidemic in Cuba. The new name was a Spanish attempt at a Swahili phrase “ki denga pepo” which describes a sudden cramping seizure caused by an evil spirit! Let me assure you that the local brand of Dengue Fever owes nothing to spirits, evil, bottled or otherwise.
Like Malaria, the virus is carried by mosquitoes, this time by one called Aedes aegypti. The virus itself is related to Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis and Yellow fever, and there are four “serotypes” or subgroups of it.
The mosquito lays its eggs in water containers, preferring the clean water found in water tanks and pots, in the saucers under pot plants and even under the pet’s food dish. Inside discarded car tyres are another favourite spot. These mosquitoes are not of the adventurous type and feed during the day and spend their time within 200 metres of their hatchery. Consequently, the eradication of any local breeding areas becomes very important towards maintaining your own health, as you can see. Keep your home free from lying water for a radius of 200 metres and you’re looking good!
Simple Dengue (if you can call it that) has an incubation period of around four to seven days and then the full blown symptoms of high fever and headache begin. The headache is usually behind the eyes and is made worse by eye movement. From there, the pains progress to the limbs with acute muscle pains, which gave it the old name “Break Bone Fever”. Interestingly, some patients complain of a metallic taste in the mouth. (Please don’t ask - I have no idea why!)
On the other hand, Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever can certainly be fatal! It appears that Serotype 2 may be the culprit here, but does not usually produce DHF unless you have been previously bitten by types 1, 3 or 4. In addition to the symptoms of Classical Dengue the skin begins to bruise very easily as the blood haemorrhages into the skin. Children are also more susceptible to this than adults. This also becomes much more of an emergency and is best treated in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of your favourite hospital.
With our ability to treat the viral ailments being very limited, the defence against the Dengue virus lies in the preventive measures. The other precautions are to wear long trousers and long sleeved shirts, especially at sun up and sun down, when the mosquito is at its most ravenous. The other factor to remember is “D” for Dengue and “D” for DEET. DEET is the magic ingredient in mosquito repellents, so when you go to buy some, check the label – if it has DEET, then get it. And then remember to use it!


Discover Japan through contemporary posters

Katsuhiro Shinohara, Japanese Consul in Chiang Mai (second from left) visited the poster exhibition with guests.

Preeyanoot Jittawong
A Japanese poster exhibition entitled “Discover Japan through Contemporary Posters”, was held at the Culture and Arts Hall, Chiang Mai University, which was officially opened on May 9.
This exhibition was arranged by the Japan Foundation, with the dual purpose of introducing Japanese culture to international countries and to further good relationships between both countries by promoting cultural exchange. This exhibition is of posters which have been made in Japan and come in many designs; such as arts exhibition posters, leading-brand clothes posters, competitions, make-up posters, etc. altogether totaling 75 categories. This exhibition will be of particular benefit to those involved in advertising design and for design institutes.
This exhibition will be open until May 28, Monday – Saturday from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. After closing in Chiang Mai, this exhibition will next be held in Indonesia.


Far Eastern College upgrades to University

Chamrat Nongmak, president of university institute of Far Eastern University.

Nopniwat Krailerg and Preeyanoot Jittawong
The Far Eastern College has been officially upgraded to be the “Far Eastern University” and a ceremony to mark the occasion took place on May 8. The charter to change the status from “College” to “University” was granted by the Ministry of Education on April 20, 2006.
The Far Eastern University has constantly developed its teaching methods since it opened as a college in 2000. The University had the vision to be a high class business academy and to produce scholars with the quality of entrepreneurship, conversant with languages and modern technology; and are virtuous, have high moral fiber, and have the conscious mind of being Thai.
The Far Eastern University has increased its departments and now has three thriving faculties and 11 departments. There are many academic exchange programs with international universities; such as a program for the Chinese language curriculum with the University of China. The University has established an entrepreneurship Research and Development Center, and the most recent addition is the establishment of a training center for medium and small businesses in cooperation with the Department of Industrial Promotion, to improve the potential of business owners in Chiang Mai and nearby provinces.
The Far Eastern University has prepared for the future by planning to construct a second Far Eastern University on the middle ring road at Tambon San Pak Wan, Hang Dong district on 104 rai of land, which expected to be up and running in 2008.


Commemorative bag sales to benefit charity

Bag-tag and stickers “We Love the King”.

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Central Pattana Company will donate the entire revenue of “We love the king” bag tag sales towards scholarships. This project aims to sell 10,000 bag-tags in the shape of a heart, with the words “We Love the King”, which will be distributed in all branches of Central Plaza. The revenue from these sales will be donated to the Phra Dabos Foundation to provide scholarships for needy and poor youths”.
Several well known actresses and actors joined the sales force to boost sales of the bag tags and to hand out “We Love the King” stickers. The bag-tags have been made in a limited edition of only 10,000 pieces at a cost of 100 baht each. Orders for the bag-tags could be placed from May 15, 2006 onwards, at the public relations service counter of all branches of Central Pattana Plaza and they will be available for distribution on June 1, 2006.