NEWS
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Chiang Mai Buddhists celebrate Visakha Bucha Day

Armed Red Wa capture Christian missionaries

Chiang Mai provides almost 12 million baht to restore important temples

Red minibusses stop service on two routes

CCC hopeful economy will pick up after Constitutional Court decision

Chiang Mai mass transport system could be busses

Thais and Burmese involved in human trafficking

KNPP is ready to negotiate with Burmese government

56 patients with Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in Phrae

A pregnant elephant dies despite all efforts of Elephant Hospital

The Netherlands brings a tulip field for Royal Flora Ratchaphruek 2006

Bus owners want government to install the CNG pipeline

English teacher found dead

Too many eggs in drug courier’s basket

Thai wife stabbed her foreign husband with screwdriver

Thai-American missing, Thought to be in Burma

Copy coppers stealing property from real police stations

Rangers intercept 61,790 ya ba pills in Chiang Rai

Chiang Mai Buddhists celebrate Visakha Bucha Day

Saksit Meesubkwang
Several thousand devout Buddhists gathered in front of the Kru Ba Sriwichai Monument on the evening of May 11, to take part in the Wai Sa Parami activity, by walking up Doi Suthep Mountain.
The huge throng walked up to Wat Phra Thad Doi Suthep, a distance of around 12 kilometers, the head of the long column arriving at the temple at around 1 a.m. May 12, Visakha Bucha Day, an important Buddhist religious day. The Visakha Bucha Day activity this year was special, as it was the 635 year anniversary of the establishment of Wat Phra Thad Doi Suthep. So, to mark the occasion, Chiang Mai Buddhists presented breakfast to 635 monks and novices.
Further activities such as presenting holy water and monk’s robes donated by members of the royal family to Wat Phra Thad Doi Suthep took place on this auspicious occasion, including supplies, and scholarships given to novices studying and living in Wat Phra Thad Doi Suthep.
In Chiang Mai City, many people assembled at Wat Suan Dok, one of oldest temples in Chiang Mai to carry out a similar Buddhist activity on the occasion of Visakha Bucha Day. During the evening, many Buddhists gathered at the nearby temple to join in a Wien Tien ceremony which involved walking around the pagoda holding candles, joss sticks and flowers.
The walk up Doi Suthep Mountain was held in association with the Center for the Promotion of Arts and Culture of Chiang Mai University, Suthep TAO, Pang Faen Nature Study Center, the Environment Conservation Club of Yupparaj Wittayalai School, the Rak Doi Suthep Group, Sangwan Wittaya School.


Armed Red Wa capture Christian missionaries

Saksit Meesubkwang.
Since the end of March there has been a spate of kidnappings, believed to have been carried out by the Wa Army in Burma. On May 11, SHAN news agency reported that 19 captured hostages had been released, most of them young people. Another 15 hostages were known to be still held captive in Muang Mai, the area controlled by Pao Yao Liang, the younger brother of Pao Yao Chiang, the highest leader of United Wa State Army (UWSA). About 250 Christian missionaries were captured and interrogated by the Wa army, when they were returning from a Christian conference that had been held in Thailand in March, at Baan Nhong Khiaw, Tambon Muang Na, Chiang Dao district, Chiang Mai.
However, all of them were later released.
The news source reported that the reason why the Wa army captured the Christian missionaries was because they believed that the missionaries had provided intelligence to US drug suppression officers, which was the source of evidence against eight Wa leaders in the US courts on April 24, on charges of producing and selling narcotics. This caused a lot of anger in the Wa army-command; and gave rise to the strong rumor that the Wa army had issued orders to assassinate US narcotic suppression officers who were operating in Thailand.
A Christian Lahu said that the arrest of the Christian missionaries by the Wa army may backfire on them if they are not careful, because there are many Christians among their own troops; with at least three high ranking Wa leaders; such as Sor Hol, Sam Pleek and Tham Thang, who are all Christians.


Chiang Mai provides almost 12 million baht to restore important temples

246 temples will be upgraded.

Nopniwat Krailerg
Suwat Tantipat, Chiang Mai governor presided over a seminar on restoration for important temples of Chiang Mai province, with the senior monk Phra Ratchakemakorn, sub-head of Chiang Mai monks, plus abbots from 246 temples.
The thrust of the seminar was to emphasize that all abbots and other concerned parties should know their duty in persuading Buddhists to participate in the conservation of temples in their own area; as well as keeping them clean and to maintain them properly.
To aid this process, Chiang Mai Provincial Buddhist Office which is responsible for coordinating this project, and Chiang Mai province, have provided almost 12 million baht for restoration work, to be carried out on the 246 temples.
The Chiang Mai governor said that the policy covering temple restoration had come about when four Chiang Mai MPs addressed the subject of MP’s duty to promote Buddhism. The seminar participants also shared and exchanged knowledge with one another concerning the dissemination of Buddhism and its development.


Red minibusses stop service on two routes

Call on their president to step down

Red mini buses feel the fuel pinch. (File photo)

Nopniwat Krailerg and Saksit Meesubkwang
High fuel costs have put the brakes to two red minibus routes in Chiang Mai. Line 4, from Carrefour to Chiang Mai Airport, and line 8, from Chiang Mai provincial government office to Chiang Mai Airport, will be temporarily void of red minibuses because operators say that can no longer earn a profit.
Chaisit Chaima, vice president of Lanna Transport Cooperatives said that 100 red minibusses which joined the mass transport project were subsidised by Chiang Mai Municipality, which paid each driver 100 baht a day. However, not many passengers used the service and even with the 100 baht daily subsidy, most of the time it was financially not worthwhile. Consequently, the cooperative announced they would suspend the service for the time being and is now negotiating with the administrators of Chiang Mai Municipality but resolution has yet to be concluded.
In another protest, 100 red minibus drivers gathered in front of Lanna Transport Cooperatives office on Thipanet Road, Tambon Haiya in Muang, Chiang Mai. They called for Singhkham Nunti, president of the cooperatives and 15 other committee members to resign from their posts. They alleged there were some decidedly non-transparent dealings by the committee which was charging 70,000 baht for a yellow license plate to new members who applied to become a red minibus. Another reason for calling for the president to step down was that the rules of their cooperative clearly stated that the president of the cooperatives and the committees are only entitled to hold that post for two periods, or a maximum of four years.
Those 100 members requested that Phadej Ditsayarak, administrative officer of Chiang Mai Cooperatives should take over as president. They also want the president of the cooperatives and committees to return all the latest conference agenda to members as well as resigning. Furthermore, they want a new lawyer for the cooperatives. After listening to their requests, the cooperatives assured them they would reply later, as Singhkham Nunti, the incumbent president of the cooperatives was away.


CCC hopeful economy will pick up after Constitutional Court decision

President Norong Tananuwat, Chiang Mai Chamber of Commerce

Saksit Meesubkwang
Norong Tananuwat, president of Chiang Mai Chamber of Commerce said that the political situation had become less tense after the resolution of constitutional court on May 8 had been announced. He said he believed that foreign investors would be more confident to invest in Thailand especially in the high budget projects like the Mass Transport system. Previously foreign firms were not prepared to risk bidding for these projects because of the unstable political situation. However, business has not decelerated and the economy should return to its usual state.
He added that the chamber had supported several missions in nearby countries, especially those linked by the Mekong River, such as China Myanmar and Laos. The Thai government had presented several projects to those countries, including offering their citizens the opportunity to learn in the seven universities in Chiang Mai. Furthermore, Chiang Mai is a place of investment for foreign investors in the health business, such as spas and hospitals, which are in both the private and government sectors and are full of the latest modern equipment.


Chiang Mai mass transport system could be busses

Dr. Rangsan Udomsri

Nopniwat Krailerg
The Office of Transport and Traffic Policy and Planning (OTTPP), in cooperation with the Engineering Service Office of Chiang Mai University (CMU) and Chiang Mai Municipality hosted a seminar to canvas the thoughts of the general public about the development of a Chiang Mai mass transport system.
This project had been authorized by cabinet when they visited Lamphun on June 29, 2004 for the mobile cabinet conference. The budget of 150 million baht for this project was granted in the middle of 2005, and CMU was assigned to conduct a feasibility study for 10 monhs. This study period was from January to November, 2006.
Dr. Rangsan Udomsri, manager of the study project said that it is absolutely necessary to have it up and running in the next 20 years with 14 billion baht being spent on four routes and 17 billion baht being spent for 3-10 years of short term on seven routes.
He disclosed that Chiang Mai town is planning construction on 430 square kilometers of area directly involving 5-6 hundred thousand citizens. This is important, with Chiang Mai being promoted by the government as a Regional Aviation Hub. Mass transport should be set up as an essential part of the basic structure of the city, to accommodate the huge number of vehicles in Chiang Mai, which is higher than several Asian cities of similar size. In 2005, there were 1.24 million assorted vehicles on Chiang Mai’s streets, comprising 73.3 percent motorcycles, 26.5 percent cars, pick ups and vans and 0.2 percent of other kinds of vehicles.

Attendants at the seminar.
In 2005, local residents were making 1.8 million trips a day; 1.5 million trips were taken by Muang people, 47.6 percent of which were in private cars and pick ups, 43.3 percent on motorcycles and only 5 percent on red minibuses and public vehicles (117,800 trips per day). Traffic jams are sure to get more frequent and prolonged in future if a mass transport is not developed, as the trend of private vehicle ownership is growing 5-6 percent per year. It is also predicted that without public transport, private vehicles will be used to take around 5 million trips per day in 2010 and 2011. Therefore, mass transport is the best choice to prevent gridlock in the city in the near future, and several forms are being considered, namely; Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), Monorail, Light Rail Transit (LRT) and Mass Rapid Transit (MRT).
The needs of the citizens were subject to a poll, and 53 percent thought it should be safe, 53 percent believed it must be on time, 28 percent agreed it must be convenient and 5 percent considered it should be modern. 46 percent thought it should be constructed at ground level, 33 percent would like it to be built as an elevated structure and 20 percent thought it should be constructed underground. Meanwhile, 32 percent are concerned about possible vibration, 24 percent are concerned it will block out the scenery, 24 percent are afraid it will affect the lifestyle of the city and 7 percent are concerned it will affect ancient places.


Thais and Burmese involved in human trafficking

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Wiboon Phrairatanatham, Baan Huay Kaew village headman at Tambon Pha Bong in Muang, Mae Hong Son, performed a citizen’s arrest on 11 Burmese-Tai tribe aliens including four females, six males and a boy.
The people in question were found traveling on foot through Baan Huay Kaew Village, on their way to Baan Chang Lek at Tambon Huay Pong. The village headman informed Pol. Capt. Wiboon Khampairoj, who headed a force of police officers to arrest the aliens; and the gang members who were smuggling the aliens into Thailand. They were later identified as Jai (last name unknown), 27 who also mentioned a Thai man named Toon (last name unknown), but police knew the Thai man, and he also was arrested.
Jai informed the officers that he and the other man had learnt from a Burmese agent at Baan Hua Muang that he could send them to work in Chiang Mai, so they paid 4,000 baht or 100,000 Kyat per person to the Burmese agent. They had to hide from the Burmese army and lived in the forest for three nights, close to Mae Aw Luang in Burma, before entering into Thailand at Baan Rak Thai, Tambon Mok Cham Pae in Muang, Mae Hong Son on April 30, 2006. They stayed there for three nights and later on May 5, the Thai man Toon picked up the 11 people from Baan Na Pa Pak. They traveled in an unregistered white Suzuki Caribbean, but nearing the Burmese border at Baan Huay Kaew, near Baan Huay Klee, Toon told them to walk the rest of the way to the destination at Baan Huay Pong; a distance of about 20 kilometers, where another vehicle would take them to Chiang Mai. Jai added that everybody had paid the first part of the fee totaling 24,000 baht to the agent; and after arriving in Chiang Mai, they would pay a further 16,000 baht in cash.
Pol. Col. Pongpipat Kawiwong, superintendent acting for Muang Mae Hong Son Police Station revealed that after he learnt that case he immediately assigned police officers to follow the Thai agent. If any government official is concerned this process, he or she will be punished according to law, and possessions seized.


KNPP is ready to negotiate with Burmese government

Saksit Meesubkwang
The Karenni National Progressive Party (KNPP) held its annual conference on May 4-6, 2006, which concluded that if the fighting in Myanmar still continues, they hold out little hope of Burma becoming a democratic country. Burmese government military forces are constantly changing their battle strategies to suppress minority groups; and have increased the number of mine fields, which are killing and maiming people who inhabit the Karenni state. However, Karennis are still ready to negotiate a truce with the Burmese government.
Maj. Gen. Bee Thu, commander of the Karenni army and vice-president of the KNPP, said that the fight between Burmese soldiers and minority groups still continues and is getting more severe. They believe that the Burmese Army leaders had been given the green light from some powerful countries, such as China, Indonesia and Russia, who were supplying them with arms, in exchange for resources in Myanmar, namely hardwoods, gemstones and natural gas. He felt that this was also part of a policy to counter the growing influence of Western countries; such as the U.S., who are seeking to push for Myanmar to become a democratic country.
The strategies used by the Burmese army to suppress minority groups have recently been intensified, and KNPP soldiers have observed the Burmese army moving SSM (Surface-to-surface missile) launchers to the perimeter, which they intend to use to destroy the KNPP fortress.
The Karenni has prepared to negotiate for reconciliation with the Burmese government and for Karenni people to leave their hometowns and live in Thailand. However, the negotiations have to be official, with a third country witnessing the meeting. Myanmar must also not take advantage of the cease-fire during the negotiations, by sending soldiers to occupy the Karenni’s perimeter and chasing residents from their homes, as they did with the Free Karen group in Tak.


56 patients with Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in Phrae

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Dr. Preeda Disuwan, head officer of Phrae Provincial Public Health Office revealed that Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) was spreading in several districts of Phrae province, and at the moment, 56 patients had contracted the disease.
Because the rainy season has started earlier than usual this year, it has provided many suitable places for mosquitoes to lay their eggs. However, after the Provincial Public Health Office found patients falling ill with this disease, health officers were immediately sent to check households. At Tambon Muang Maw in Muang, Phrae they found mosquito larva on tree leaves and in abandoned tyres, so the officers stressed to residents that they should clean up anywhere in the villages where the mosquitoes might lay their eggs, including cutting off tree-branches to control the disease.
The head officer warned residents that it was the common house mosquito that carried DHF, and anyone bitten by these pests would be liable to catch the disease. He advised all residents to be careful during the day, because that was when this particular kind of mosquito was most active.
The best way of preventing Dengue hemorrhagic fever is to interrupt the mosquito’s breeding cycle, which occurs every seven days, by removing or preventing the shallow pools of water which are its favorite breeding places. If anyone has bowls holding water plants, a good idea is to keep several small fish in these bowls which will eat the larvae; but any thing that is likely to hold water, such as tin cans or household rubbish, will attract the mosquito and should be removed to prevent this happening.


A pregnant elephant dies despite all efforts of Elephant Hospital

Chiangmai Mail Reporter
Veterinarians of Friends of the Asian Elephant Hospital in Hang Chat, Lampang admitted Phang Kham Sri, 35, a pregnant female elephant which had been sent from Tambon Mae Yam Noi in Khun Yuam, Mae Hong Son.
Somsak Kopkootham, the elephant’s owner said that she had been pregnant for around eighteen months but last month she had an accident with another elephant, that ran and crashed into her causing her to fall down on the ground. At that time, she showed no sign of any injuries but recently over the last several days she became weak and did not take food. He sent her to the elephant hospital, but despite the tremendous efforts of the veterinary team to save her life, the elephant’s condition deteriorated rapidly and she died shortly after admission, together with her still-born baby.


The Netherlands brings a tulip field for Royal Flora Ratchaphruek 2006

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
The Netherlands announced that it is ready to attend the Royal Flora Ratchaphruek 2006, International Horticultural Exposition, and proposes to bring a complete tulip field by air to display in the beautiful garden zone. It will be arranged in postcard form on a wide area, as a tribute to His Majesty the King on the occasion of the 60 year anniversary of ascending the throne. It will be decorated with tulips, laid out in stripes of white, red and blue, which are the colors of the Dutch flag. There will also be a wind turbine and information, so that all visitors can experience the many different aspects of Holland.
Peter Mares, Holland’s ambassador to Thailand, said that the tulip garden will cover an area of 1,500 square meters. The process of planting commenced at the beginning of this month; and we will try to make it a permanent garden of Dutch tulips, by using the latest technology to maintain freshness as long as possible. It will be presented to HM the King, so that Thai citizens will realize the strong friendship that exists between the two countries.
He added, “This exposition is not only to celebrate the King’s diamond jubilee, but also to promote Thailand’s wonderful tourism to foreigners, and also a unique opportunity to see many beautiful exotic plants and flowers from around the world, all in one place.


Bus owners want government to install the CNG pipeline

Saksit Meesubkwang
Somchai Thongkhamkoon, managing director of Chai Pattana Transportation Co., Ltd., one of the biggest bus business owners in the eight upper Northern provinces, also known as the “Green Bus”, said that the oil price crisis at this time is directly affecting bus business owners because fuel costs are a major part of their daily running costs. If the oil price raises 1 baht per liter, that affects the investment by as much as 8 percent.
Now the diesel price has risen to be nearly 30 baht, the company has to wait for a coupon from the Department of Land Transportation which enables the bus companies to buy fuel 1 baht per liter cheaper than at the petrol station, which is due to start on May 15.
If this does not work, Somchai said he will coordinate with the president of the bus business association of Thailand to discuss the situation with the government, or many business owners will be in financial trouble. He said that bus business owners in the North already pay 50 satang per liter more for gasoline due to the higher transportation fee.
Somchai Thongkhamkoon also said that one way to solve this problem is to reduce the number of trips. Phayao and Nan route (both outbound and return) will be reduced to 80 trips, especially on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Another solution to the problem would be to use CNG (compressed natural gas) due to its lower cost. If the government installs the pipeline to the Northern region, as it has long promised to do, business owners are ready to cooperate.
The rising oil price has caused the company’s growth rate to diminish. In 2003 and 2004, the number of passengers increased by 5 percent. However in 2005, the income was less than half of that of the previous year. In 2006, it was expected to grow by 5 percent, but the company seems unlikely to achieve this goal due to the fuel transportation fees.


English teacher found dead

Preeyanoot Jittawong
The body of Alastair Milmael Howell, 28, an Englishman in Chiang Mai working as an English teacher was found in his apartment in Chiang Mai. He had been dead for three days, judging by the stage of decomposition, according to police. A syringe was found hanging out of his right arm. There was a glass of water on the table, which was heroin stained; and four more syringes were also discovered. There were no signs of any foul play in the room.
Police learned from the apartment staff that the man had rented that room since March 13, 2006. He usually went out every day and returned the same night, until recently on May 10, 2006 which was the last time the staff-member had seen him alive. Later, a friend of the deceased, who lived in a nearby apartment, smelled the odor of decay coming from the man’s room. She knocked on his door but receiving no response, she used the reserve key to get into the room and found the corpse. Police officers assume that he had injected too much heroin, which caused him to go into shock and die. However, the body was sent for post-mortem examination at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, to ascertain the cause of death.


Too many eggs in drug courier’s basket

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Pol. Col. Prajak Awaiwanon, superintendent of Mae Fa Luang Police Station, Chiang Rai headed a force of police after a tip-off that many ya ba pills would be transferred from a hill tribe village in Burma to Thailand, crossing the Thai-Burmese border near Baan Lise-Baan La at Doi Pha Chang Moob, Mae Fa Luang in Chiang Rai.
At Doi Chang Moob, two men riding a motorbike who fitted the descriptions given by the informants, were stopped by the police at the road-block. The police officers asked the pillion passenger, who was holding a basket with several hens inside, to submit to a search. A check of the basket revealed a plastic bag containing 25,000 ya ba pills. He was identified as Dow (last name unknown), 58, a black Lahu tribesman living in Phrao, Chiang Mai. The driver of the motorcycle was released because he had just been hired by Dow to pick him up and drive the motorbike, but was not involved in the transfer.
The offender was arrested and sent to Mae Fa Luang Police Station to face charges. He admitted that he had traveled from Phrao, Chiang Mai to visit relatives in Burma, passing through Baan Lise. On the way home, he purchased the ya ba, intending to distribute the narcotics in Phrao. He hid the drugs in the basket of poultry, not realizing the police were obstructing that route, so he was caught red handed.


Thai wife stabbed her foreign husband with screwdriver

Nopniwat Krailerg
Police were called to an incident in the Elephant pub in the Muang Chiang Mai and found that a male foreigner had been stabbed.
At the crime scene police found blood stains in the bedroom on the 2
nd floor. The injured man was identified as Englishman Simon Constandtin, 34. He was immediately sent to hospital and had suffered what appeared to be a deep wound to his head. His attacker was Sirirat Jitranam, 19, a resident of Nong Khai, purporting to be Simon’s girlfriend. Police officers took her into custody to face charges of wounding with a ten inch screwdriver.
Doctors checked Simon’s condition at the hospital and found his wounds to be quite serious, but fortunately not critical. Their examination revealed that Simon had a five inch deep wound to the head.
During interrogation, Sirirat said that although they were not married, she and Simon had lived together as husband and wife for two years. At first, he was a good guy and helped her earn a living, until lately, he started drinking. When he got drunk, he used her as a punch bag. Before the incident occurred, Simon was drunk and shouted at Sirirat to open the door, but she was asleep upstairs and didn’t hear him at first. When she eventually opened the door, he hit her and pushed her to the ground. She would not stand for being beaten any longer, so she grabbed a nearby screwdriver and stabbed him in the head. After the interrogation, Sirirat was charged with injuring another person and will face criminal proceedings.


Thai-American missing, Thought to be in Burma

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Noppadol Sonsong, 34, asked for help from Mae Sai police, Chiang Rai to look for his older brother Noppadol Naemai, 36, a half Thai-American. His brother had mysteriously disappeared together with Noot his Burmese girlfriend, while they were traveling to the Thai-Burmese border in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai on April 26, 2006.
Noppadol has a dark complexion and is 180 cm tall. He visited Thailand during Songkran Festival to look for a suitable location for his business in Thailand; and he intended to live in the USA for only one more year, before moving to Thailand permanently.
The last known sighting of the missing persons was on April 24, when he announced his intention of visiting the Mae Sai border with his Burmese girlfriend before continuing to travel to Rangoon, Burma. After a reasonable amount of time had elapsed he tried to contact his missing brother, but so far had not received any response.
A check of his brother’s bank account with the Bangkok Bank, revealed that 90,000 baht had been withdrawn in one lump sum from the account at the Mae Sai branch of the Bangkok Bank. He also checked with Mae Sai immigration who confirmed that his brother’s name was not on the list of citizens who were traveling in Burma.
He and his family have become very concerned about his safety and that of his girlfriend; and have asked for assistance from several government organizations, but so far do not have any clue as to the whereabouts of the missing couple.
Pol. Lt. Col. Soonthorn Jantharangkoon, investigation inspector of Mae Sai Police Station revealed that after checking at Tachilek Airport, Burma, he was informed that Noppadol Naemai and his Burmese girlfriend had checked in to fly from Tachilek to Rangoon on April 27. He said that some people reported that they had seen Noppadol Naemai at Boon Yuen fresh market in May, but this did not agree with the information the Mae Sai police had received from the airport. He offered the theory that probably, they were safe and were traveling somewhere in Burma, so relatives should wait for them to get in contact.


Copy coppers stealing property from real police stations

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
As you can imagine, a police station can be a fairly busy place, with uniformed men and women, as well as officers from other jurisdictions calling on police business in pursuit of criminals in the locality. So a busy Station Sergeant could perhaps be forgiven for not noticing the odd extra uniformed police lieutenant wandering about, claiming to anyone who enquired that he was assisting in a hush-hush narcotics investigation. It was only when things like police radios and police uniforms were reported missing that somebody started to suspect that something was not quite right.
Officers of Lampang Police Station consulted their counterparts in Mae Jan Police Station in Chiang Rai, who had found that on April 27, police property in Mae Chan Police Station and nearby official offices had also gone missing. From CCTV footage the thief was identified as Nanthawat Intanai, who liked to dress himself in police uniform and pose as a Police Lieutenant.
Investigation officers of Lampang Police Station went to arrest this fake police officer, and found him while he was starting his car at the Phra Baht – Airport Road. A search revealed name cards, credit cards, ATM cards; including ID cards and driving licenses which all belonged to others, but they all had Nanthawat’s photos attached, dressed as a Pol. Lt.
The bogus police officer confessed that he had penetrated Lampang Police Station and other stations in order to steal property and he had already sold everything he had stolen. He admitted that he liked to pose as a policeman and he did not think that real police officers would be tricked.


Rangers intercept 61,790 ya ba pills in Chiang Rai

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Rangers intercepted an illegal drug network along the mountainous Thai-Burmese border at Baan Ja Bu See - Baan Pa Kha Suk Jai, Chiang Rai after being informed that there would be a large amount of drugs transferred from Burma for delivery to a drug sales network in Thailand. While the Ranger special force was patrolling in the area, they found three men staying at a hut near Jan Noi River and decided to have then checked.
Before officers could apprehend the three men, they all ran away down the mountain, disappearing into Myanmar. Rangers feared the possibility of an ambush if they pursued the men into Burma, so they searched the hut instead. This revealed a blue sack usually used by Wa soldiers, in which was hidden 61,790 orange ya ba pills and a Red Chinese hand grenade. The Ranger officers also found the I.D. card of a hill tribe man, identified as Jabu Yabaku, 22, resident of Chiang Rai. Officers brought the evidence to Mae Fa Luang Police Station to conduct further enquiries.
The special force said that they were becoming increasingly aware of serious attempts being made a drug network’s movement in nearby Burma, to transfer illegal drugs at several places along the border at Mae Fa Luang district, Mae Chan district, and Mae Ai district in Chiang Mai to deliver to a Mr. Big in Thailand. Pha Muang Task Force officers who are responsible for the area along Thai-Burmese border have stepped up patrols in order to intercept and arrest those responsible for shipping the drugs. This latest drug seizure may be from Red Wa, which hires hill tribe people to smuggle illegal products into Thailand. Unfortunately, during the transferring process, officers were only able to seize the drugs and not the mules, and Mr. Big remains Mr. At Large.