Vol. V No. 25 - Saturday June 17, - June 23, 2006
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by Saichon Paewsoongnern
 

 


NEWS
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Overseas Royalty visits Chiang Mai

Former Lamphun governor inducted as new Chiang Rai governor

Burma on lookout for signs of subversion

Minority groups in Burmar honor HM the King celebrating the 60th anniversary of his ascension to the throne

Khon Hak Chiang Mai files charges against Chiang Mai Night Safari

Flow rate for Ping river set to give prior flood warnings

Long-neck Karens to be relocated as a tourist attraction

Ministry of Public Health believes that Thailand is safe from bird flu

Thai agro-market down 50 percent due to lack of post-harvest technology

Product delivery crossing the Mae Sai will be more lenient after changing Burmese officers in charge

Good Samaritans have lucky escape

Three murder suspects apprehended, but one still at large

Competition in Myanmar increases price of opium

Chiang Mai governor kicks footy gamblers into touch

Academy student not too bright or speedy

Big bang on bus

Overseas Royalty visits Chiang Mai

Mark Bradford (left), GM of Mandarin Oriental Dhara Dhevi, Chiang Mai and Savas Rattakunjara (right), executive assistant manager welcome HRH Prince Andrew, the Duke of York upon his arrival at the resort. (Photo by Phatthawut Wutthipraphanphong)

Nopniwat Krailerg
During the grand celebrations for HM the King’s 60th anniversary of his accession to the throne June 9-13, royal guests from many countries visited Chiang Mai, including HRH Prince Andrew the Duke of York, Prince Albert II of Monaco and the King and Queen of Lesotho. They visited Huay Hong Krai Royal Development Study Canter, created through the initiatives of HM the King, Baan Thawai wooden handicraft and sculpture center in Hang Dong district, and Doi Suthep Temple.
Chiang Mai prepared the routes the royal visitors traveled with displays of the Thai national flag, royal guests’ flags, and flags with the symbol to honor HM the King.
This was a personal visit and the royals were warmly welcomed by Chiang Mai’s governor, international consuls, officials, judges, attorney generals, military officers, police officers, students and even housewives at Wing 41 Military Airport.
There was traditional Lanna style dancing and students waving Thai national flags along the route to the Mandarin Oriental Dhara Dhevi Hotel, which was the resting place chosen by HRH the Duke of York, Prince Andrew, for his personal visit.
This was a visit by the royal guests before going to Bangkok on June 12 to participate in the ceremony of honoring HM the King celebrating the 60th anniversary of his ascension to the throne.


Former Lamphun governor inducted as new Chiang Rai governor

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Udom Phuasakul has been admitted as the new Chiang Rai governor amidst a warm welcome by government officials, merchants and residents of Chiang Rai.
Having arrived in Chiang Rai, the new governor went to worship at the monument of King Meng Rai before traveling to the Chiang Rai governor’s residence. In the afternoon, he went to pay his respects at the City Pillar at Wat Phra Thad Doi Tung and prayed for blessing from the monks of that temple.
Udom Phuasakul, the new Chiang Rai governor used to serve as assistant to the Chiang Mai governor before being appointed as Chiang Mai deputy governor and then Lamphun governor.
His wife, Dr. Inthira Phuasakul, is president of the Chiang Rai Red Cross and serves as a government official at the Department of Mental Health, for the Ministry of Public Health.


Burma on lookout for signs of subversion

Saksit Meesubkwang
Following the extension (yet again) of the house arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese authorities are apparently worried that there will be civil unrest, and even subversion. Burmese central government officers and about 100 military, police and customs officers blockaded 100 of the huge warehouses used to store imported products from Thailand in Myawaddy, opposite Mae Sod district, near Tak because they wanted to examine the premises for contraband such as weapons and ammunition as well as untaxed products and forbidden items. During this blockade, Burmese merchants were forced to stop importing products from Thailand and were unable to move the products already stored in Myanmar, which cost several million baht in lost business.
The Burmese authorities were worried that minority groups and anti-government groups would cause chaos in Myanmar. The government had ordered stricter measures along the border area, which unfortunately is also the import/export route to Myanmar.


Minority groups in Burmar honor HM the King celebrating the 60th anniversary of his ascension to the throne

Khajohn Boonphat
The Wa National Army (WNA) recently held a ceremony to honor HM the King of Thailand’s celebrating the 60
th anniversary of his ascension to the throne. In the document, it said that HM the King is beloved and respected by people all over the world. It is the first time in 30 years that the WNA have organized this ceremony.
The ceremony was simply organized and started with lighting candles to worship HM the King Bhumibol Adulyadej’s picture, followed by firecrackers, firing a salute and the presentation of a document honoring HM the King. They recognize HM the King as the monarch who has reigned for the longest period in the world, and they wished long life to the King.

The leader of the Wa National Army (WNA) honoring HM the King of Thailand.

150 Wa people and soldiers who participated in this ceremony. Some people came from Baan Mae Or Luang, Baan Mae Or Orn, Baan Mai, and Baan Hua Ha to take part in this ceremony. One member of the WNA said that he had been a soldier for 30 years, but it was HM the King’s virtue that made this ceremony possible.
There was also a ceremony organized by minority groups who live along the Thai-Burmese border at Mae Hong Son; such as the Shan State Army (SSA), the Karenni National Progressive Party (KNPP) and the Wa National Army (WNA).
In Myanmar, especially in Shan state, many people respect HM the King Bhumibol Adulyadej as though he was their own monarch; and there is a picture of HM the King in almost every house.


Khon Hak Chiang Mai files charges against Chiang Mai Night Safari

Saksit Meesubkwang
Khon Hak Chiang Mai Alliance, allied organizations, and those who were affected by Chiang Mai Night Safari’s construction project, filed charges at the Administrative Court, Chiang Mai, against the Chiang Mai Night Safari that it is an unlawful project and has caused negative effects to the public.
Chaiphan Praphasawat and 26 members of his staff filed this case, first of all bringing charges against the prime minister; and secondly, against the director of Area Development for Sustainable Tourism Organization and members of his committee, including Plodprasope Surasawadee.
Chaiphan Praphasawat, director of the Community Rights Institute, as one of the plaintiffs, said that many people had tried to dissuade the Night Safari from going ahead with this operation from the beginning, because this project trespasses on the forest of a National Park which is public property, and using 1.7 billion baht of public money to fund the illegal project.
The alliance group had tried to do everything within the constitution to get the project stopped, but to no avail. They finally decided that it was time to file charges against the Night Safari in the administrative court as the last reliable hope for the people. The Alliance members want to make this case an example for social justice. There are numerous projects currently in the pipeline, which are similar in many respects to this case, so if this project is allowed to go ahead, it will be difficult to stop other projects.
Kwanchai Chotiphan, the environmental lawyer who is responsible for filing the case said that there are many issues concerned with this case against Chiang Mai night Safari. Wichit Pattanakosai, deputy director general acting for the Department of National Parks, does not have any authority to develop within National Park boundaries. The construction of Chiang Mai Night Safari within the National Park boundaries violates the National Park and Environmental Promotion and Preservation Acts. Introducing wildlife into Chiang Mai night Safari contravenes many aspects of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES); and the Wild Flora and Fauna and Wildlife Protection Act. There should have been an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the Chiang Mai Night Safari project and if there has been such an assessment, there has been no public hearing to discuss the results. The occupation of the position as president of the Area Development for Sustainable Tourism Administrative Committee by Plodprasope Surasawadee is also unlawful, as he has a political position. Most importantly, private organizations and ordinary people had strenuously objected to this project, but they had been ignored.
The alliance group wants the administrative court to cancel the position of the president of Area Development for Sustainable Tourism Administrative Committee currently occupied by Plodprasope Surasawadee, and he should be made to return his salary. The alliance also requests that the court should stop any further construction, especially the Elephant Park, which intrudes on more than 5,000 rai of forest.


Flow rate for Ping river set to give prior flood warnings

Saksit Meesubkwang
Thada Sukhupunaphan, director of the Hydrology and Water Management Center for the Upper Northern Region said that the Royal Irrigation Department had held an urgent meeting to plan for flood prevention with several organizations including Chiang Mai Municipality and the Hydrology and the Water Management Center for the Upper Northern Region. The outcome of the meeting was that they had categorized the flooding situation into two major problems; floods caused by overflowing water and flood caused by heavy rain and stagnant water.
The meeting allocated the responsibilities with Chiang Mai Municipality being made responsible for solving the problem of flooding from Doi Suthep which will flow down to Huay Kaew Road and Suthep Road, eventually overflowing into the Ping River. Chiang Mai Municipality plans to build a sandbag wall to prevent flooding at risky points.
The Regional Irrigation Office and the Hydrology and Water Management Center for the Upper Northern Region will be responsible for Mae Ngat Somboon Chon Dam in Mae Taeng district and Mae Kuang Udom Thara in Doi Saket district to control the amount of rain and water from this water source. They aim to reduce the water level in Mae Ngat Somboon Chon Dam by about 50 million cubic meters to be left with around 70 million cubic meters or approximately 40 percent capacity. They also aim to reduce the water level in Mae Kuang Udom Thara by 50 million cubic meters or around 50 percent. They will try to release the water at a rate of 2 million cubic meters a day. It is believed that by releasing the water steadily, it should not affect the area near the dam because there will not be too much water released at a time.
The Hydrology and Water Management Center for the Upper Northern Region will closely monitor the amount of rain accumulating at the water source in Chiang Dao district and Mae Taeng district. If the flow of water in the Ping River reaches 400 cubic meters per second, although it is capable of coping with up to 500 cubic meters per second, there will be a warning sent to different organizations and people should be prepared for sudden flooding. It is hoped that by warning people of the imminent danger, it will help to relieve the problems and effects of flooding and prevent a recurrence of the situation of last year.


Long-neck Karens to be relocated as a tourist attraction

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Long-neck Karens have been peaceably living in three villages in Muang district of Mae Hong Son, but they are being herded together to become a Long-neck Karen village, and be a tourist attraction for Mae Hong Son.
Direk Konkleeb, Mae Hong Son Governor, as the director of the Thai and Neighboring Countries Border Ordering Center on the Myanmar side in Mae Hong Son, said that 48 families (233 people) were in Baan Nai Soi in Tambon Pang Moo, 26 families (177 people) in Baan Huay Sua Thao in Tambon Pha Bong and 50 families (199 people) in Baan Huay Pu Kaeng in Tambon Pha Bong.
The province plans to move the Long-neck Karen families in Baan Nai Soi and Baan Huay Sua Thao, to Baan Huay Pu Kaeng in Tambon Pha Bong, Muang district, Mae Hong Son on the shore of the Pai River. Tourists will then be able to visit the Long-neck Karen Village both by cars and boats on the Pai River. This location will be a good tourist attraction.
Wisoot Buachoom, director of Mae Hong Son Tourism Coordination Center said that the Long-neck Karen relocation plan will be beneficial to tourism. The province also plans to adjust the scenery surrounding the village to blend in with the Pai River shore, which will attract both Thai and foreign tourists.
On one side of the border it seems as though these Karen people are being oppressed, while on the other they are being used for commercial gain, itself another form of oppression.


Ministry of Public Health believes that Thailand is safe from bird flu

Preeyanoot Jittawong
Dr. Surasingh Wisarootrat, sub head officer of Chiang Mai Provincial Public Health Office in cooperation with Vet. Somporn Pornwisetsirikul, the secretary of Chiang Mai Bird Flu Prevention Center held a press conference talking about the progress of bird flu prevention in Thailand since 2004.

Dr. Surasingh Wisarootrat, sub head officer of Chiang Mai Provincial Public Health Office (left) and Vet. Somporn Pornwisetsirikul, Committee and secretary of Chiang Mai Bird Flu Prevention Center (right).
The world-wide statistics according to the brief report from World Health Organization (WHO) since December 26, 2003 – April 17, 2006, shows that 44 countries have confirmed the spread of bird flu in poultry. There have been 194 patients who were infected with bird flu worldwide. 109 have died in nine countries; 93 patients and 42 dead in Vietnam, 31 patients and 23 dead in Indonesia, and there have been 22 patients, of whom 14 have died in Thailand.
The local campaign hinges on six-monthly chest X-Rays, to prevent the disease spreading, to search for the disease and eliminate it; and to study the progress of the disease, including evaluating the bird flu situation in each area.
According to the Chiang Mai Bird Flu Prevention Center, patients suspected of catching the disease are quickly able to be sent for treatment in a Public Health Service Center. The latest x-ray results from October 1, 2005 to April 20, 2006 show that in 19 districts of Chiang Mai, there are 57 patients who were suspected of catching the disease but after checking, bird flu has not been found in these patients. However, health-workers who are taking care of these patients are still x-raying and monitoring the situation continually and the next time for x-rays will be applied between June 1 and July 31, 2006. This is one month earlier than last year because the rainy season is coming earlier, making the conditions, the temperature and the environment particularly conducive for bird flu to spread.
Every hospital is in a high state of readiness to deal with any outbreak of the disease. The Public Health Office also recommends that merchants should not cut off the heads off dead winged livestock for sale and residents should wash their hands every time after touching winged livestock. If it is necessary to touch winged livestock, residents should wear protective clothing and gloves and wash totally every time after doing so. Livestock officers and Public Health officers should be informed immediately if any winged livestock has died. In the meantime, if any person develops a fever, cough, feels pain in the throat and has mucus, especially after contact with dead winged livestock, they should go to see a doctor. All these measures will hopefully control the bird flu and Thailand will be safe from this disease.


Thai agro-market down 50 percent due to lack of post-harvest technology

Saksit Meesubkwang
Thailand’s agricultural sector is facing challenges from China, the Philippines and Mexico, according to Phaichayon Ueathaweekul, committee chairman of Swift Co who addressed the Institute of Post-Harvest, Chiang Mai University seminar. Previously, Thailand had exported agricultural products to foreign countries and gained about an 80 percent income and marketing share from Asia and Europe. This has made Thai agricultural products become well known especially in Japan as they import large amounts of Thai agricultural products every year.
However, there are many kinds of agricultural products competing for a share of the same market due to post-harvest technology giving the products longer shelf life and higher quality. Many countries compete with Thailand, such as the Philippines and Mexico, which both export mangos, but they use post-harvest technology to reduce delivery times, giving them the advantage of delivering cheaper and higher-quality products. Thailand loses more than 100 billion baht a year, after producing a first class product but failing to get that product to the marketplace in good condition.
Phaichayon said it is up to the government to promote the delivery logistics because that is the main factor that governs price fixing and quality control. If there is a swift and efficient transfer of produce, the delivery and production cost will be lower. Also, if the post-harvest technology is correctly used, it will extend the product’s life.
He said that at the moment, the Company’s mango products shelflife is 30 days, but Japan and Europe are demanding a shelflife of 35 days. Moreover, Chinese agricultural products have started to seriously compete with Thailand. China has suitable conditions, which are beneficial to its product’s preservation, which is what the market wants, especially in Europe. This results in Thailand losing about 50 percent of the market share for those particular products.


Product delivery crossing the Mae Sai will be more lenient after changing Burmese officers in charge

Thai-Maynmar border Mae Sai, Chiang Rai (Photo by Preeyanoot Jittawong )

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Choochai Udompode, Mae Sai Custom officer, said that after the annual change of Burmese Customs executives, there was a new chief, and a new assistant, of trading control and customs. According to an unofficial discussion, there will be leniency shown for products, which up till now, have always been forbidden in Myanmar.
The number of import-export products at Mae Sai district, Chiang Rai had changed remarkably. In first three months of 2006, Chinese imports had decreased from about 40 million baht to 10 million baht. This was due to the political situation in Myanmar and the oil price crisis that made it more difficult to transfer goods and caused prices to rise. The average cost of exporting had increased by 10 percent. There was also a strong rumor that there were Indian products from the Indian-Burmese border being smuggled across the Thai-Burmese border, but customs officers found nothing to substantiate these rumours. Most products which are imported and exported at Mae Sai customs are Chinese products.


Good Samaritans have lucky escape

Murray Dickson
Two “Good Samaritans” have had a lucky escape following a horrific traffic accident near Jomtien. The pair, Jim Soutar, executive director of the Pakanyor Foundation and his associate Dave Doll from Phuket were driving from Chiang Mai to Jomtien last Friday afternoon when their car was involved in a collision with a 6-wheel truck loaded with corn.
Their Audi-A80 sedan was a write-off and while Dave Doll escaped with bruises and lacerations, Jim Soutar was not so fortunate. He was taken to hospital where X-rays revealed he had broken both his collar bones and sustained five broken ribs amongst other injuries. He was later transferred to the McCormick Hospital in Chiang Mai for surgery.

It could be several months before Jim Souter is fully recovered.

Jim and Dave had been involved in arranging emergency accommodation for teachers and students at the Karen secondary school in the Chom Thong district, some 60 kilometres southwest of Chiangmai. Buildings at the school were destroyed by fire late last month. (See last week’s report in the Chiangmai Mail)
Following the fire, Jim and Dave who had previously been involved in relief operations as a result of the Boxing Day tsunami, arranged for two large accommodation domes donated by the Freemasons of Western Australia and Pattaya in conjunction with the Rotary Clubs of Pattaya and Jomtien along with private local individuals, to be transported to the school site. Just prior to Saturday’s accident the two men were preparing the domes; each valued around 350,000 baht for occupation.
Despite his injuries, Dave Doll has continued with the supervision of the erection of the first dome which is almost ready for occupation. The second dome is expected to be habitable by the end of next week.
The latest report from doctors attending to Jim Souter indicates he will remain in hospital for at least another week and it could be several months before he is fully recovered.


Three murder suspects apprehended, but one still at large

Nopniwat Krailerg and Saksit Meesubkwang
It appears that the killers of Seksan Sukaseme, an owner of Bua Luang Tour and a Harley Davidson spares distribution outlet on Charoenmuang Road, are being brought to justice. The charred and handcuffed body was found on May 30, in a longan orchard, Mae Taeng district, Chiang Mai.
Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya, Commissioner of Provincial Police Bureau 5 set an investigation team to work with the task of finding the killers. Enquiries revealed that the cause of the crime was an argument over a business deal.

Anusorn Sothiwut (left) one of three suspects.

The police asked were able to arrest Adisorn Chatposakul, 26, resident of Chiang Rai; Supharp Atama, 24, resident of Chiang Mai; and Anusorn Sothiwut, 32, resident of Bangkok. They were charged with murder, and attempting to destroy the body. There is still believed to be a Mr. Big, who managed to escape arrest but is identified as Potcharaphon or “Dam” Pimphimai, 45, resident of Tambon Hai Ya, Chiang Mai. Police officers believe that he escaped to Nong Khai.
Police officers also impounded three motorcycles which were used in the crime, one grey pick-up truck, and one Honda CR-V which belonged to Potcharaphon.
Pol. Col. Chamnan Ruadrew, Deputy Commander of Chiang Mai Provincial Police together with investigation officers of Chiang Mai Provincial police, gave a press conference to report on the progress of the case on June 12 and brought the three accused to reenact the murder.
Apparently, the four killers lured Seksan from his house near Chiang Mai Railway Station to a meeting at Adisorn’s house at Nanthana Project 2, San Sai district, Chiang Mai. They then caught Seksan, tied him up and covered his head with a sack. They then robbed him of all his property, including a black Harley Davidson chopper, a gold necklace, a gold ring and watch, which totaled approximately 600,000 baht, after which, they sold Seksan’s gold necklace at a gold shop and hid his chopper. The killers then placed Seksan in the trunk of a car and went to several places in Chiang Mai looking for equipment, especially tires, fuel, and handcuffs. Having found all they wanted, they handcuffed Seksan and covered his head with a sack. They then moved him to another truck and drove around looking for a place to commit murder. They finally decided on the longan orchard at Mae Taeng district, where the killers tied Seksan’s neck and battered him to death with a gun butt, before burning the body with fuel and tires in an attempt to destroy the evidence.

Police brought the three men to reenact the killing at the crime scene.


Competition in Myanmar increases price of opium

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
SHAN news agency reported on June 8 that the raw opium costs in eastern and southern areas of Shan State are now increasing because of competition between the Red Wa, Gogang and former alliances of Khun Sa. Each is buying the raw product to produce heroin in factories along the Thai border, to distribute to clients in Thailand.
Before the price war started, raw opium in Muang Tone, opposite Chiang Mai stood at 18,000 baht per Joint (1.6 kilogram), but now it is 20,000 baht per Joint. In the western area of the Salween River, the price of raw opium went up from 17,500 baht per Joint to between 24,500-28,000 baht.
The source revealed that one of the customers who had bought raw opium was Laolu, 55, a close aide of Law Sing Han. Laolu runs a heroin factory at Baan New Thao Huay Kai Luang, 28 kilometers to the north of Muang Tone, which he set up in 2004. Two other buyers included another man also called Laolu, 52 and Haw Ping, 45, who were drug merchants in the network of Wei Hseuh-kang and both known to be running heroin factories. Their factories are guarded by Wa soldiers. The source added that both factories had to pay a tax to the Burmese soldiers for this security service.
The chemical substances used for producing heroin are brought from Muang Ngan and Muang Peng, areas controlled by the Red Wa of UWSA; and are transferred together with timber belonging to the Red Wa sections 171 and 414. Red Wa deals both in drugs and timber at the same time.
It is believed that one of the most active drug sources exporting to Thailand is in Muang Tone and has dealt continually since 2003. Thai authorities have made serious efforts to suppress these activities and have managed to close down more than 10 factories. However, three Red Wa factories are still active and two of them are located at Baan Hua Pang Hua Yawd and the other is in Muang Jod, opposite Chiang Dao.


Chiang Mai governor kicks footy gamblers into touch

Nopniwat Krailerg
Entertainment places in Chiang Mai have been checked to prevent football gambling by no less a senior figure than Suwat Tantipat, Chiang Mai Governor, together with Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya, commissioner of the Provincial Police Bureau Region 5. Border crossing points are also being checked after it was learnt that some Thai agents are dealing in football gambling in neighboring countries.

Suwat Tantipat, Chiang Mai Governor together with Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya, commissioner of the Provincial Police Bureau Region 5 checking entertainment places in Chiang Mai during the World Cup period.

The Chiang Mai governor warned all entertainment places to cooperate with the authorities and keep an eye out for football gambling and if any entertainment place was found allowing the visitors to gamble, it would be immediately closed.
The commissioner said that he had stressed to all police in each area of the Northern region, especially those near the border crossing points to check tourists entering and leaving the Kingdom, after hearing that some Thai agents were working in neighboring countries.


Academy student not too bright or speedy

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
After the usual tip-off, Chiang Rai police set up a road block to look for ya ba being transported from Myanmar to the local area. Pol. Maj. Col. Kamnuan Laohanan, suppression inspector of Mae Chan Police Station, Chiang Rai set up the checkpoint in front of Kiw Thap Yang Mogul Shrine, Paholyothin Road, Mae Chan district, Chiang Rai.
Officers saw a young man riding an unregistered motorcycle and called on him to stop and be checked, but he accelerated and rode straight through the police checkpoint. Officers followed him in a patrol car and were able to catch him after a very short pursuit. The man was identified as Therdsak Tanual, 21, a resident of Phayao. Officers found a pack of ya ba pills (116 pills) hidden in his underwear. He was sent to Chiang Rai police station to face legal proceedings.
During interrogation, the accused said he was a student at an academy in Chiang Rai. He sold ya ba pills to other youngsters in Chiang Rai, trying to get money to gamble on football games with his friends. Before being arrested, he had taken 4,000 baht cash to buy ya ba pills from the Thai-Burmese border in Mae Chan district. On his return, when he reached the checkpoint, he was afraid of being arrested, so he tried to ride through the checkpoint, but needed more speed to shake off his pursuers.


Big bang on bus

Saksit Meesubkwang
Bomb experts from the Border Patrol Police 33 from Mae Rim, Chiang Mai were called to deal with a bomb discovered on a tour bus belonging to Phu Luang Transport on the route between Khon Kaen and Chiang Mai. An M 67 bomb was found still in good condition that might have exploded at any time, however the experts were able to safely remove it from the bus, fortunately without incident.

A bomb expert from Border Patrol Police 33 removes the bomb.

Police officers questioned the bus driver and learned that while preparing to load passengers at Khon Kaen bus station who saw the bomb and immediately called the police to deal with it.
Further enquiries revealed that the previous passenger on that seat was a navy soldier. The bomb might have fallen from his pack when he was sitting there, but nevertheless, the police said they would follow him for further investigation.
After the event took place, Chanchai Kilapaeng, head officer of Chiang Mai Land Transport Office stressed that ticket officers should strictly record names and other details of passengers, to make them easier to trace if any unexpected situation took place. He would also like commanding officers of each military organization to stress to their soldiers that they should not carry dangerous weapons on public transport because of the danger to other passengers.



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