Vol. V No. 28 - Saturday July 8, - July 14, 2006
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ACADEMIA NUTS
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

People walk up to Doi Suthep to honor HM the King

Environment Exhibition

Learning Styles

People walk up to Doi Suthep to honor HM the King

Parade presenting HM the King’s image and golden and silver trays.

Nopniwat Krailerg
Photo by Saksit Meesubkwang

Early morning pilgrimage by people wearing yellow shirts commenced at 5 a.m. on June 30, on the arduous walk up to Doi Suthep, starting from Rukkhachat public park in Chiang Mai, end route to Phu Ping Palace. This was led by Suwat Tantipat, Chiang Mai Governor, to honor HM the King Bhumibol Adulyadej the Great, who this year is celebrating the 60
th anniversary of his accession to the throne.
Before the walk, Suwat Tantipat paid his respects to Khru Ba Sri Wichai Statue. The parade was reached Phu Ping Palace at around 2 p.m. There were seven resting points along the way to change over the people who were carrying articles of worship. On completion of the march, Suwat Tantipat was honored to present the articles of worship at Phu Ping Palace.

Numerous people walking up to Phu Ping Palace.


Environment Exhibition

Chiangmai Mail Reporter
Talented students from Varee Chiangmai School won the first prize for the best exhibition board and the second prize in a singing contest to honor the king on World Environment Day.

Environment exhibition board competition winning team and the student who won the singing contest of Varee Chiangmai School

Recently the Office of Environment Region 1 in cooperation with government organizations, private sector, local organizations and residents of Chiang Mai and Lamphun celebrated World Environment Day 2006 to honour the king on his 60 year anniversary of accession to the throne. The event took place at the Sufficient Economy Study Center of the Northern Region at Baan Pakrai, Tambon Maesa in Mae Rim, Chiang Mai.
There was also a competition between students of each school to create a board that displayed information about the environment and the king. The first prize for this competition was won by the team from Varee Chiangmai School, all students in the 11th grade and identified as Ratcharin Singhkarat, Nopparat Intaratpak and Natdanai Na Chiang Mai. Areerat Ratanapradit, also an 11th grade student of Varee Chiangmai School won a prize for singing a song honoring the king and received a certificate from Chiang Mai Deputy Governor, Kritsadaporn Siampakdi.


Learning Styles

Ann R. Schechter
Special Education teacher at Lanna International School

As an educational consultant specializing in learning difficulties, I am always discovering new ways in which people learn and think. Just as no two people look exactly alike, no two individuals think or learn in precisely the same way. Each of us takes in information and processes it in a unique combination of ways. This is known as our learning style.
When teaching students with learning disabilities (LD’s), it is of primary importance to discover each student’s particular learning style in order to improve classroom performance. But learning style awareness is not only for those working with LD’s. Lesson plans that incorporate the various learning styles can improve all students’ learning and understanding of classroom material.
So, what exactly are learning styles? Learning styles are simply different approaches or ways of learning. There are three fundamental types, based on the senses most used to perceive and process information.
Visual learners learn through seeing. These learners need to see the teacher’s body language and facial expression to fully understand the content of a lesson. They tend to prefer sitting at the front of the classroom to avoid visual obstructions, such as the heads of other students. They may think in pictures and learn best from visual displays including diagrams, illustrated text books, overhead transparencies, videos, flipcharts and hand-outs. During a lecture or classroom discussion, visual learners often prefer to absorb the information by taking detailed notes. Visual learners are divided into verbal and nonverbal categories. Visual verbal learners learn and remember through words, often making lists and using outlines as guides. Visual non-verbal learners benefit from charts and graphs and often visualize an idea as a picture in their mind in order to understand it.
Auditory learners
learn through listening. They learn best through hearing verbal lectures and discussions, talking things through and listening to what others have to say. Auditory learners interpret the underlying meanings of speech through listening to tone of voice, pitch, speed and other nuances. Written information may have little meaning until it is heard. These learners often benefit from reading text aloud and using a tape recorder.
Tactile/kinesthetic learners learn through, moving, doing and touching. Tactile/kinesthetic
persons learn best through a hands-on approach, actively exploring the physical world around them. They may find it hard to sit still for long periods and may become distracted by their need for activity and exploration.
Teachers who accommodate their teaching to include all three styles not only help those students with LD’s, but keep the lessons varied and interesting for all their students. A typical lesson plan could include an introductory discussion, handouts with key words and concepts (or writing them out on the board) group/discovery activity, reading assignments, maps and pictures. In this way, all types of learners are given the opportunity to grasp the information in the way most suitable for them, and the varying types of repetition reinforce the lesson for the entire class.
Knowing one’s learning style is more than just a classroom concern. No matter how old we get, we continue to learn new things about the world around us, new ways to do things, and hopefully new discoveries about ourselves. By being aware of our own learning style, we can make these experiences easier and more productive. And by understanding the learning styles of the people we are with, we can better communicate our ideas to them and appreciate their point of view.
I invite you, in the coming weeks, to join me in the real world laboratory of the classroom. We will discuss strategies for each learning style, and see how these are applied as I return as a student, for an intensive course in elementary Thai, together with my 13 year-old son.



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