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Chiangmai Mail joins the people of Thailand to humbly wish Her Royal Highness Princess Soamsawalee a very Happy Birthday Thursday July 13

Chiang Mai celebrates Buddhist Lent

Deregistered Austrian doctor arrested for illegal practice, causing deaths of cancer patients

Chiang Mai Immigration coming down heavily on hotel operators

Conflict still over Mae Maw Powerhouse progress

Opium found hidden in packages to be sent to America

Long Neck Karen persuaded to live in New Zealand

Mae Hong Son floods cause one death and much damage

Dams release water for flood mitigation

Media as peacemakers amidst Mekong basin countries?

Unlit intersections a traffic hazard

Muslims living in America

Man spends 12 hours in air-con duct

Your ya ba is now coming by train

Brother-in-law’s killer dumps body in canal

Footy bookmakers and bag-snatching gangs busted by top cop

Nocturnal police blitz turns up shady characters and unregistered motorcycles

Chiangmai Mail joins the people of Thailand to humbly wish Her Royal Highness Princess Soamsawalee a very Happy Birthday Thursday July 13

(Photo courtesy of the Bureau of the Royal Household)


Chiang Mai celebrates Buddhist Lent

Chiang Mai celebrated Buddhist Lent between July 2 to 11 with parades and presentation of many giant candles. These candles were carved and decorated by surrounding communities and given to temples around the city and other activities. Buddhist Lent is a solemn period in the Buddhist calendar and people make merit and practice abstinence. It also marks the beginning of the period coinciding with the onset of the rains, when the monks cease traveling and remain in the monasteries.


Deregistered Austrian doctor arrested for illegal practice, causing deaths of cancer patients

Saksit Meesubkwang
Australian Federal Police in cooperation with Provincial Police Bureau Region 5 arrested a deregistered Austrian doctor who claimed to be able to cure cancer, but many of his “patients” had died.

Hellfried Sartori, the disgraced
Austrian doctor.

Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya, Commissioner of Provincial Police Bureau Region 5 said that, on November 16, 2005, Australian Federal Police had come to Chiang Mai and asked the local police to assist in investigating the cause of death of numerous Australian people in the Northern Territory and Western Territory of Australia. They had all been treated by an Austrian man named Hellfried Sartori, 67, who purported to be a doctor and had fled to Chiang Mai and offered treatment via his website. Then, on February 20th, 2006, the Australian Federation Police were informed that Katherine Preston, an Australian woman who had been treated by him, died at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital and it was suspected that the cause of death was from his treatment.
Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong also said that after coordinating with the Australian Federal Police, he issued orders to the special investigation department to trace his whereabouts. The officers were aware that he claimed to be a doctor concerned with treating cancer and were informed of a patient, identified as Melissa Judith Taylor, 33, a New Zealander who was unconscious and undergoing emergency treatment in Chiang Mai Ram Hospital.
When she recovered, she informed the police that she was acquainted with the ‘doctor’ via the Internet; where he claimed that he could cure cancer. So she flew to Thailand to receive treatment in Chiang Mai. She stated that she had agreed to make an initial payment of 900,000 baht. He treated her in a room in a Chiang Mai hotel that he had converted into an operating theatre. He injected a substance he called “Ozone” into her body and soon after she went into shock and was sent to Central Chiang Mai Hospital.

A video recording shows Sartori injecting Ozone into a patient’s body at his illegal clinic.

Learning of this, police applied for an arrest warrant from Chiang Mai Court and apprehended the man. He was charged with fraud and working as a medical practitioner without a license.
The ‘doctor’ had several prior offences to his name and was also charged that on June 5, 2006, he fraudulently offered treatment to an American, for which he was paid 612,000 baht. Previously, he had been arrested in New York City, in the US on May 18th, 1995 on a charge of posing as a doctor. Also, on July 17, 1998, he was arrested in Washington, US on a similar charge. He claimed to have a cure for cancer and injected his patients with “Ozone gas”.
Investigations by Chiangmai Mail reporters revealed that the former physician, Hellfried Sartori, received his primary degree in medicine from the University of Graz Medical School in Austria, and went to America where he became involved in ‘alternative’ treatments for many conditions.
One of these was Cesium therapy and he began this program in 1981 at Life Sciences Universal Medical Clinic. He was also involved with the so-called ‘chelation therapy’ which uses a series of intravenous infusions containing EDTA and various other substances, which is falsely claimed to be effective against cardiovascular disease, autism, and many other diseases and conditions. The use of chelation for such purposes is considered substandard medical practice. Hellfried Sartori was subsequently struck off the medical register in the US in 1985 and convicted of practicing medicine without a license after injecting ozone into patients intravenously and performing chelation therapy via injection of EDTA to treat various diseases.
It would appear that he continued with this line of treatment, recruiting his “patients” via the Internet.


Chiang Mai Immigration coming down heavily on hotel operators

Saksit Meesubkwang
Chiang Mai is a tourist city, and the government promotes the city as being the center of tourism in the Asia Pacific region. Each year, the city is visited by thousands of tourists from Asia, Europe, and America who stay in the many hotels, guesthouses and shelters.

Pol. Col. Sa-ngob Sanudorn, superintendent of Chiang Mai Immigration police.

Immigration regulations require accommodation business owners to inform the immigration police within 24 hours of the details and numbers and nationalities of foreign tourists staying in their premises. “If they fail to comply with this regulation, it violates Act 77, and renders them liable to be fined between 2,000 and 10,000 baht per person per night,” said Pol. Col. Sa-ngob Sanudorn, superintendent of Chiang Mai Immigrations police.
Pol. Col. Sa-ngob also said that during the eight months since he had been promoted to this position, he had talked to accommodation business owners in Chiang Mai and warned them to comply with the regulations. The Immigration Police have particularly warned business owners of the several five-star hotels in Chiang Mai who had claimed to a Chiang Mai local news reporter that they are not afraid of the law. Immigration officers warned the hotel owners and managers that they would face legal proceedings if they were found to have violated the regulations, with no exception.


Conflict still over Mae Maw Powerhouse progress

Saksit Meesubkwang
The case concerning the residents who are affected by Mae Maw Powerhouse in Lampang Province just goes on and on. The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) would like residents to move out from the area where they wish to build a powerhouse, to an alternative place provided nearby, but some groups of residents have been totally dissatisfied with EGAT’s arrangements and jointly sued EGAT in 2002; and recently more than 120 residents sued again in June as reported in Chiangmai Mail.
Recently, an administration court investigated the officers concerned while Lampang vice Governor, Wanchai Sutthiworachai said that construction on the new homes for those displaced residents was now nearing completion, with 52 percent of the access roads in place and 51 percent of public water services finished. The province was hoping to relocate some residents in mid-July or August but this date kept getting put back due to the fact that some residents had refused to move out from the Mae Maw Powerhouse area; while some villagers were squatting in the alternative area provided for residents who were displaced by the new Mae Maw Powerhouse, so that construction could not go ahead.
The Lampang Governor also added that the province already removed two households that were trespassing, but in the meantime some villagers had petitioned the administration court of Chiang Mai not to let the construction process go ahead on that land. The province explained that providing alternative homes for the displaced residents was according to the government’s policy; and those people who had initially lived there had possessed the land illegally. This policy was not to consider just the needs of individuals, but addresses the requirements of all groups of citizens. The province would set up a committee to estimate requirements of different groups of residents who would move from the powerhouse area to live there. These residents would be allowed to be a part of the process and consult with government organizations so that after they had moved in, the authorities would train different people in various new occupations. The governor stressed that the Minister of Natural Resources and Environment had advised this plan of action, when he visited Lampang.


Opium found hidden in packages to be sent to America

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Becoming suspicious of five packages destined for California USA, on July 7, post office workers informed Chiang Rai police who inspected and opened the packages. Inside, they found numerous costumes, lingerie and shoes, but concealed amongst those items they also discovered 100 packs of opium weighing 3.5 kgs packed in black packs hidden inside the heels of the shoes.
Police interviewed the observant post office staff who were able to identify the person who posted the parcels as Nu Saewang, 26, a Hmong tribesman living in Chiang Rai. Police arrested him, and he confessed that he was the sender of the packages. He immediately grassed on another five colleagues in the parcel scam and who are now being traced by police.
Police investigation revealed that the opium was imported from Burma via Wiang Kaen district. The ready-to-use opium is more expensive than raw opium because it does not have to be heated and can be used instantly. In Thailand, its street value would be at least 200,000 baht. However, if sold in the USA, its retail value would exceed 20 million baht. Previously, there had been a case of someone smuggling opium in ceramic and sculptured products.


Long Neck Karen persuaded to live in New Zealand

Saksit Meesubkwang
Long Neck Karen in Mae Hong Son will be relocated, while some others have been offered the chance to live in New Zealand. Mae Hong Son was mentioned in overseas newspaper reports that it took care of Long Neck Karen as if it was treating animals, but the governor reacted strongly to this allegation proclaiming that it was not true, and that he had asked for permission to set up a cultural village for the Long Neck Karen.
The disgruntled Mae Hong Son Governor, Direk Konkleep, disclosed that the province had ordered security and administration organizations of the province to move Long Neck Karen currently living at Baan Nai Soy Village and Baan Huay Sue Tao Village to move to Baan Nam Piang Din or Baan Huay Poo Kang Village in Muang Mae Hong Son, which has always been a Long Neck Karen Village.
The governor said that a private organization from New Zealand which had traveled to interview Long Neck Karen and select some of them to live in New Zealand had made rather insulting allegations, saying that Mae Hong Son Province took care of these people as though they were animals; and the private organization of New Zealand would construct a permanent village for these people. The governor said that Long Neck Karen had lived in Mae Hong Son for more than 10 years and they attracted many tourists, and the province never treated them in the manner which the New Zealanders were claiming.
The province sent a petition to Ministry of the Interior, asking them to cancel the permission allowing the Long Neck Karen to go to New Zealand; and asked for authorization to set up a “Long Neck Karen Culture Conservation Village” at Baan Nam Piang Din Village, and to gather all Long Neck Karen currently living at different locations around Mae Hong Son to relocate there. Direk reported that the Long Neck Karen lifestyle would be shown in that village and tourists who came to experience the long-neck culture and traditions would be charged in the usual way and the revenue would go directly to the villagers as part of their income.
The choices for the Long Neck Karen are to move into Baan Nam Piang Din or Baan Huay Poo Kang Village that the province provides or to travel to a third country. This choice only applies to those who have lived in Mae Hong Son as war refugees for more than ten years; otherwise the province will press for them to return to Myanmar.


Mae Hong Son floods cause one death and much damage

Khajohn Boonphat
Continuous rain in Mae Hong Son caused mountain streams to go into spate, flooding households and agricultural areas in Muang District. A local resident was swept away by the floods which also caused route number 1095 (Mae Hong Son-Pai) at Baan Tha Krai in Pang Mapha to be cut. The bus which plies that route daily had to suspend service temporarily and six villages were also cut off. In the meantime, Pai District Office warned residents to be aware of higher water levels in the Pai River and foreign tourists were moved out from high-risk areas.
On the evening of July 5, villagers of Baan Pha Bong, Mae Hong Son learnt from the authorities and soldiers from the Pha Bong base that mountain streams were flooding into the Nam Mae Ja River. Manit Pinta, 48, a villager of Baan Pha Bong Village, who was crossing the river was swept away in the raging torrent. The border patrol police of base 336 in cooperation with the Public Disaster Relief Foundation of Mae Hong Son jointly searched for the body but had to abandon the search when the water level increased to even more dangerous levels.
Meanwhile, Muang District Chief Officer, Manit Satthaphon reported from Tambon Huay Pong that rain fell the whole day and night at Baan Palan, Baan Kaen Fa and Baan Mai Hung villages. The torrential downpour caused the Nam Mae Ja River and tributary creeks to rise rapidly and the mountain torrent flooded households in Baan Kaen Fa Village at Tambon Huay Pong, Baan Pha Bong at Tambon Pha Bong, as well as inundating 2500 rai of agricultural land.
Pang Mapha District Chief Office, Suchat Teekahsuk revealed that the rain that fell continuously throughout the night caused a landslide which carried away part of route 1095 near the Agricultural Research Center at Baan Tha Krai and Baan Rai. Swift action by engineers restored this important road the next day. Five cows belonging to a local farmer were swept away and a bridge linking Baan Tham Lod and Baan Na Luang was damaged, isolating 3,000 villagers of six nearby tourism villages. A group of foreign tourists staying in the village of Baan Tham Lod were temporarily stranded by the floods, but officers immediately sent a rescue team to get them out of danger.
Pai District Chief Office warned that the water level in the Pai River had risen to dangerous levels so the office warned residents living near high-risk areas to move out to safer ground. Police officers were called to a guesthouse located near the Pai River to help eight foreigners who were stuck there.
The flooding situation in Mae Hong Son has got worse, with almost 5,000 rai of agricultural land now under water and 20 households severely damaged, affecting 6,500 villagers, including numerous livestock. The situation is worsening hourly owing to continuous torrential rain falling in all areas and the water level in creeks rising rapidly. The authorities have warned all residents to move out from risky areas and recently vehicles have been unable to travel along route number 108 because it is flooded 1.50 meters deep. THAI airlines have been forced to cancel a flight and might need to stop all flights because of poor visibility and the horrendous weather conditions.


Dams release water for flood mitigation

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Thada Sukhapunaphan, director of the Hydrology and Water Management Center for the Upper Northern Region explained the flood prevention plan for the Northern Region. He reported that the number of officers had been increased, with orders to monitor the amount of rainfall and to check water levels in catchment areas all over the Northern Region since July 1, to prevent floods in the region. Main dams and reservoirs in the Northern Region are closely coordinated to prevent floods and the water level in the dams has been lowered to make room for the forthcoming rainfall.
Mae Ngad Somboonchon Dam in Mae Taeng district, Chiang Mai, has lowered the water level down to 70 million cubic meters (75 percent) from the maximum capacity of 265 million cubic meters. Mae Guang Udom Thara Dam has also released 75 percent of its water level. Other main dams in the Northern Region will also release the water depending on the levels in each dam, so as not to affect water requirements during a drought crisis. Mae Ngad Somboonchon is the main dam which affects flooding in Chiang Mai because the outfall of this dam releases water directly into the Ping River.


Media as peacemakers amidst Mekong basin countries?

Saksit Meesubkwang
An international academic seminar was held on July 7 and among the subjects on the agenda were the roles of the media in promoting peace in countries in the Mekong River basin.
The seminar was held at Chiang Mai University, presided over by CMU vice president and joined by several prominent academics. The principal lecturer at the seminar was Ms. Emma Giliam; Head of project (Tree of Life Project) from the BBC World Service Trust, assisted by James David Fafn; Executive Director of Earth Journalism Network and Jeff Hudson; Trainer of IMMF and several other experts in their individual fields.
Jeff Hudson expressed that the media in this region had a clear role, but their perceived image differed according to each country’s politics and economic situation. For example, the government controlled the media in Laos and Vietnam; therefore, it mostly presented a favorable point of view towards works of government. He believed that Media in Thailand however, a democratic country and free of government censorship, was generally able to put forward a more balanced point of view, but sometimes the news became slanted favorably towards the organization holding the purse-strings. Generally speaking, the reporting was more balanced in Thailand, with newspaper reporters and TV journalists free to support the government or criticize as they saw fit with no fear of reprisal. Meanwhile, media in Burma was seriously under the government’s thumb; and even resorted to smuggling important news stories out of the country and getting them published in countries that enjoyed press freedom. The Chinese government went one step further by actually owning every aspect of the media and only published news that it saw fit and offered no criticism to its actions.
To create peace by use of the media, he said that reporters depended on several aspects and needed to realize about various different cultures, so as not to offer biased reports according to a group’s belief and to report the truth objectively. James Fafn stressed that, to create peace, the media must be stable, unafraid and have complete freedom to present the news as they saw it.
Apinya, another lecturer, expressed the point of view that peace would happen only when media had enough freedom to report news based on righteousness, including the right of communication and information exchange that must be equal. The heart of freedom came from presenting one’s opinion freely without fear of reprisal, even when that opinion was controversial.
The Media must be a bridge for information to create a balanced society by offering a chance for people to express their opinions. For instance, citizens listen to the government all the time; therefore government should listen to the citizens. It should also be concerned about culture, religion and sensitive to differing lifestyles, accepting the difference of other people’s culture and beliefs without prejudice or criticism.


Unlit intersections a traffic hazard

This recent accident occurred at night near the non-illuminated Khuang Singha Intersection.

Nopniwat Krailerg
The tunnel construction on the Chiang Mai-Lampang Highway at the Khuang Singha Intersection and San Dek Intersection have been disrupting traffic flow for some time. Recently, the construction of a new tunnel has been started at Nhong Pratheep Intersection (intersection to San Kamphaeng), adding further delays and disruption to the already stressed motoring public. Residents have no idea when it will be finished or if the road has to be closed or whether they should make a U-turn.
In addition, numerous accidents occur at night due to the failure of the construction company to illuminate the direction signs. At night the lights are turned off at every tunnel-construction intersection, leaving the dangerous site in darkness and extremely hazardous to drivers and riders, especially tourists who are not familiar with the roads.
A local DJ who works at night and rides a motorcycle to work said that she cannot see which way to go at the Khuang Singha Intersection and the to Mae Rim district. Also, the U-turn in front of the Office of the Department of Legal Execution near Lanna Hospital is not illuminated and several times she has missed the turn and has almost been executed. Although she is familiar with the road, it is quite difficult to watch the road and at the same time watch out for other traffic. Also when it rains, the roads become very dangerous.
A student at Payap University also complained about the poor visibility when driving at night. Even when using headlights, the visibility is still bad. At every intersection, there are many large concrete barriers blocking the road which are easy to see during daylight but become very dangerous at night because they are not illuminated. He said that the construction company should be ordered to erect lights posts at every intersection for safety; with fluorescent lights over the direction signs and these lights should be turned on at night, when lights are usually needed most.
He added that government organizations that are responsible for safety matters do not enforce the regulations governing the construction sites. If safety matters are not addressed, there will be more severe accidents and lives lost; especially in November, when the roads will be busy during the International Horticultural Exposition Ratchaphruek 2006.


Muslims living in America

Saksit Meesubkwang
Imam Rahmat P. Phayakul of the Al-Fatihah Mosque, the only Thai mosque in California, said that according to the Muslim demography in the US, there are 1,209 mosques and approximately 2 million Muslims in the population. Each mosque in US has on average, 1,625 Muslims involved.

Imam Rahmat P. Phayakul, giving a special lecture “Muslims Living in America”.

He explained that Islam teaches people to be good and live at peace alongside people of other religions. As perhaps never before, the world is facing crisis, such as politics, disasters, and wars. The only thing that Muslims in the US emphasize is to call for peace throughout the world.
Imam Rahmat P. Phayakul, gave this special lecture entitled “Muslims Living in America” at the Porn Ping Tower Hotel, in Muang Chiang Mai, and was welcomed by Beatrice Camp, US Consul General to Chiang Mai; Borphit Widhayawiroj, director of Chiang Mai Cultural Center and Plangkul Wongluekiat, Chairman of the Muslim Board in Chiang Mai. It was also pointed out that there are more than 60,000 Muslims in Muang, Doi Saket, San Kamphaeng, Mae Ai, and Fang district, with four mosques and Islamic schools; two in Muang district and two in Fang district.
Imam Rahmat P. Phayakul was previously a coordinator for the Tsunami Relief Project. He took the position of president of the Thai Relief Organization which collected donations for the charity in the south of California to raise funds to help the unfortunate victims of the Tsunami in the Southern Region of Thailand and support schools in remote areas. He also helped to establish a non-profit organization for peace from 2002 to 2004. In addition to his many other duties he is also on the board of the Islamic Shura Council of Southern California, which is the organization that takes care of all the 75 mosques, Islamic schools and non-profit organizations in the US.

Seminar attendants.


Man spends 12 hours in air-con duct

Leaves frozen with 41 cell phones

Nopniwat Krailerg
A young man had hidden in the air-conditioning duct of a department store in the city center of Chiang Mai to steal cell phones valued at 500,000 baht, as well as about 120,000 baht in cash.
On July 5, police from Phuping Police Station in Muang, Chiang Mai were summonsed by a security guard and arrested Prawit Saengtim, 22, a construction worker from Phetchabun province, together with 41 cell phones and the money that he had stolen from the VT Telecom shop on the third floor of Kad Suan Kaew Department Store.
He confessed that he had hidden there for several hours in an air-conditioning duct on the roof of a games shop near the cell phone shop. When the store closed he stole the cell phones and money from the cell phone shop. He then hid in the duct all that night until next morning when the store opened and he attempted to leave with two bags containing the cell phones. However, the security guard suspected something was wrong and asked for his bags to be searched. It was difficult to explain why he needed 41 cell phones, and so the police were contacted. If nothing else, he would have been able to ring for a lawyer.


Your ya ba is now coming by train

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
Police officers arrested Sanya Chinsith, 38, a Tai tribesman and a resident of Bangkok, as he was boarding the Bangkok express train at Chiang Mai Railway Station.
He was found to be carrying 13 packs of ya ba pills in his luggage and when interrogated, he confessed that he was hired by a woman named “Aoy”, in Mae Rim district Chiang Mai and given 30,000 baht to deliver the ya ba pills to “Chai” (last name unknown), who would be waiting at Bangkok Railway Station.
Police officers coordinated with the Office of Narcotic Control Board (ONCB) to arrest “Aoy” or Tharinee Nhong-ngu at her house in Mae Rim district; and brought both she and mule Sanya to face legal proceedings.
The ONCB officers also carried on their enquiries in the hope of arresting other members of the drugs network in Bangkok, who if Sanya’s information is correct should be easily recognized standing at the platform waiting for his shipment.


Brother-in-law’s killer dumps body in canal

Saksit Meesubkwang
Having failed to solve a family conflict, a man killed his brother-in–law, (his wife’s sister’s husband) in conjunction with two other accomplices. He was arrested four days after the murder; but his two accomplices are still being pursued by the police.

Provincial Police Bureau Region 5, Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya investigating the murder.

The police called a press conference to report on the progress of this case at Muang Chiang Mai Police Station. The murderer, known as Prayut Janyarak, 59, a resident of Muang of Lop Buri was brought to the press conference and was charged with the murder of Boonnetr Boonju, 40, living near Saraphi. The killer accepted all the accusations and confessed to the murder.
After being interviewed by the police, Prayut admitted that he and two friends killed Boonnetr on a quiet path alongside an irrigation canal at Tambon Yuwha in San Pa Tong, near Chiang Mai. Before killing Boonnetr, he was subdued by being given a tranquilizer mixed in his food. The killers then tied their tranquilized victim’s hands behind his back, wrapped his face and head with masking tape and covered him with a black plastic bag before callously throwing him into the irrigation ditch.
Passers-by found the body and informed police, who investigated this case for four days before eventually finding the killer and arresting him. The murderer was a businessman running a furniture export business. The only chairs he will now be looking at are electric ones.


Footy bookmakers and bag-snatching gangs busted by top cop

Saksit Meesubkwang
Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya, Commissioner of Provincial Police Bureau Region 5, held a press-conference at Chiang Mai Police Station to report on the arrest of a football gambling gang that he had personally witnessed. The police arrested 36 members of the gang and seized three million baht cash in the gang leader’s bank account. The gang consisted of mainly teenagers and had been operating in the Muang district and San Sai district.

The accused teenagers.

The commissioner also revealed that there had been a steep rise in the instances of theft during the World Cup Festival. Police had arrested Pongsiri Thitithanaphum, Aswadej Sritrakul, Krisana, and Theerawat Wattanasilp, all of them teenagers. They had committed motorcycle theft in Chiang Mai at night and when they were apprehended police found them in possession of five stolen Honda motorcycles, three cell phones, several women’s handbags, and numerous valuable items of stolen property. The accused confessed that after stealing the property, they usually sold it immediately to get money to hang out and gamble on the World Cup.
Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong said that he had issued orders to officers in each station to be stricter and increase the frequency of patrols in all areas both by motorcycles and by foot, with the aim of reducing crime and reassuring tourists.

Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya, Commissioner of Provincial Police Bureau Region 5 checking seized evidence.


Nocturnal police blitz turns up shady characters and unregistered motorcycles

Pol. Lt. Gen. Panupong Singhara Na Ayuthaya, Commissioner of Provincial Police Bureau Region 5 checking the seized evidence at Chang Puek Police Station.

Saksit Meesubkwang
Two squads of 50 police officers launched a nocturnal blitz hoping to catch miscreants on motorcycles and deviates in dormitories.
The checkpoint team was able to apprehend 39 suspicious riders on unregistered motorbikes, which they took to be checked to see whether they were stolen, or had been used in the commission of any crimes.
The suppression team also had a fruitful night and arrested 13 people accused of various offences. One of them was an illegal alien, found in possession of 691 speed pills, a .38 caliber revolver and five bullets
Pol. Lt. Col. Panya Nawatrakulpisut, the investigation inspector said that prior to the arrests, there had been numerous complaints from nearby residents that there were groups of teenagers constantly fighting and creating noise. Police had been called on numerous occasions to suppress these disturbances. There are many academies located in Chang Puek Police Station’s area of responsibility and because of the final rounds of World Cup Festival approaching, there was an increased likelihood of football gamblers attempting to steal money by picking pockets, selling speed pills, and committing violence. Police were determined to suppress these outbreaks of violence and arrest anyone who may commit crimes and pose a threat to law and order, hence their evening’s entertainment.
Whether this blitz will have a long term effect is another matter!