ACADEMIA NUTS
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Lampang student wins NJ Spelling Bee 2006

North Keeper Wolves won 4 victories from cheerleader contest

Varee Chiangmai School wins 1st Prize at Regional Science Show

Relocating with Children

Lampang student wins NJ Spelling Bee 2006

Ronnakorn Jiamsiri-angkul, student from Bunyawat Witthayalai School, Lampang, the champion in the NJ Spelling Bee 2006.

Nopniwat Krailerg
Ronnakorn Jiamsiri-angkul, a student from Bunyawat Witthayalai School, Lampang won the right to represent the Northern Region with the highest score in the regional English spelling competition “NJ Spelling Bee 2006”. 500 college students entered the competition, coming from 14 Northern provinces; Kamphaeng Phet, Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, Nakhon Sawan, Nan, Phayao, Phitsanulok, Phetchabun, Phrae, Mae Hong Son, Lampang, Lamphun, Sukhothai and Uttaradit.
The final round of the competition is in Bangkok on December 10, 2006 with the chance to win HRH Princess Sirindhorn’s Cup as well as a two month scholarship to study English language in Australia.


North Keeper Wolves won 4 victories from cheerleader contest

North Keeper Wolves Team of Srithana Commercial Technology College, Chiang Mai.

Nopniwat Krailerg
The North Keeper Wolves Team from Srithana Commercial Technology College, Chiang Mai in its role as representative of the Thai Cheerleader Association, participated in the 2006 Down Under Spirit Championships. This prestigious event is Australia’s Premiere International Cheer & Dance Competition and took place on the Gold Coast, in Queensland Australia at the beginning of July. North Keeper Wolves won 4 awards despite facing world class competition, bringing prestige and honour to Chiang Mai and Thailand. They won 1st place in the Exhibition class, 1st runner-up in the Open Dance, 7th place in the Cheer class and achieved the highest-score award out of 30 teams from 5 countries.
Athletes in the team said that competing in Australia was good experience, because rules, judging, and consideration were different from U.S. rules that the team had applied to their practice. They made a few mistakes due to not being familiar with the floor, but they were over the moon that they had won prizes in every class and will continue practicing.
Prior to this competition, North Keeper Wolves of Srithana Commercial Technology College, Chiang Mai had won the college class twice in a row and won other prizes in the Northern Region and national classes. Srithana Commercial Technology College, Chiang Mai seriously supports their team and hired a trainer who was a former member of the cheerleader team from Bangkok University, previously cheerleader champion team of Thailand.


Varee Chiangmai School wins 1st Prize at Regional Science Show

The team members received certificates from former director of Science Center for Study, Lampang, and Niphat Sattaratanakajorn.

Chiangmai Mail Reporters
The Science Center for Study, Lampang held a Science Show 2006 for regional elementary and middle school students on July 12-14. The event was put on to encourage students to show off their scientific ability and knowledge, which would hopefully stimulate them to be more interested in science.
The Science Show attracted the entry of 10 teams of elementary school students and the winning team was Varee Chiangmai School, who presented a Science Show VDO, which will be shown at national level. Members of the team were Bencharat Mahamit, Thaweepong Rojanapongsathaporn and Saran Saribut, grade 6 students, coached by Ajarn Malinee Saebug and Ajarn Thanaphat Nongyao.


Relocating with Children

Ann R. Schechter
Special Education Teacher Lanna International School
Relocating is a fact of modern life which most families will face at least once. Whether across town or across the globe, this is an event that can be disruptive and traumatic for both parents and children. Children may be excited by the prospect of a new home and school, and scared at the same time. Teenagers may worry about fitting in with their new peer group, or be angry with parents who seem to have ruined the lives they have so carefully put together.
Being prepared for these changes can help ease this transition for both parent and child. By anticipating the concerns associated with each age, a parent can help to make relocation a positive experience.
Children below the age of six may be the easiest to move with, but your attention and preparation are still very important to ease your youngster into his new life. A child’s primary concern at this age is being left behind, and leaving things behind. Explain to your young child about the move in clear and simple language. Storybooks on this subject are readily available to help explain what is going on around him. It may also be beneficial to play with toys, acting out the move. When packing up the child’s belongings, make sure to explain that they are not being thrown out. A great idea is to have the child help with the packing, and label his or her own box with special stickers so that it can be easily identified on moving day. Avoid making other major changes during this time, such as moving from a crib to a bed, or toilet training. This will make life easier for both of you. If possible, arrange for your child to stay with a friend or relative on moving day.
Changes in routine are the primary worry of elementary school children. Though open to the move, they need to be kept informed of things before they happen to feel comfortable. Tell your child how their routine will be affected. Bring them to see the new home and school before the move. If that is not possible try to get pictures of the new home, neighborhood and school. The more information the child has, the more relaxed he will be. Try to include information on extracurricular activities and other things he or she likes to do. Knowing where the pizza parlor, baseball field or library is can alleviate a lot of anxiety. Also be prepared with all the necessary documents for admitting your child into school to avoid delays.
Teenagers have the most concerns about relocation. It is important to discuss this decision with your teenager, as it affects everything important in their lives- friends, school, work and possibly a boy/girl friend, and yet they may feel they have little or no control over the situation. Children at this age are also concerned about fitting in, which group they will belong to and what will be different. A trip to the new neighborhood is just as beneficial for this age as for your younger children. It is particularly important that you let your teenager know you want to hear about any concerns and that you respect those concerns. Avoid trivializing or dismissing his or her feelings. It may be helpful to see the move as a rehearsal for future transitions like college or a new job. If your teen remains strongly resistant to a mid-year relocation, it may make more sense for him to remain behind in the old location to finish out this school year
Although a move can present many challenges, it can also be a time for your family to grow closer and for you to learn more about your children. If approached with warmth, concern and honesty, a move can be remembered for all the good things that came from it, in spite of the difficulties. Next week I will discuss strategies for dealing with the period following the move.