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Payap University success in 4th Choir Olympics / World Choir Games 2006

Preventing reading problems - Improving reading skills

Teachers Connect 2006

Payap University success in 4th Choir Olympics / World Choir Games 2006

Chiangmai Mail Reporter
Payap Sacred Music Singers of the Music Department, Payap University gave outstanding performances and brought home two bronze medals as a gift for Chiang Mai from the 4th Choir Olympics / World Choir Games 2006 in Xiamen, China.

The Chinese team

The Choir Association of Thailand in cooperation with government and private sectors, supported several Thai choirs to compete in the 4th Choir Olympics / World Choir Games 2006 in Xiamen, China during July 15 to 26, 2006. Payap Sacred Music Singers of Payap University was one of Thailand’s representatives that attended the competition, which attracted almost 300 teams from 70 countries worldwide.
The Payap Sacred Music Singers did a magnificent job and were awarded bronze medals in the Mixed Chamber Choirs and the Music a sacra a cappella classes. The award of these two bronze medals, won despite a very high standard of competition, should make Chiang Mai and Thailand very happy and proud of the band.
Besides the outstanding achievments of the Payap University Choir, St. John’s Choir, from St. John’s University in Bangkok also won a gold medal in the Scenic Folklore class; while The Voice band from Thailand won the silver medal in the Contemporary Music class and the bronze medal in the Gospel & Spiritual class.


Preventing reading problems - Improving reading skills

Part 1- Preschool age children

Ann R. Schechter. Teacher
of Special Education at Lanna International School

Reading is an essential skill in today’s world. We now live in the information age with an increasingly competitive global economy. Advances in technology place require greater literacy of all of us. While most children learn to read well enough, these increased demands create harsher consequences for those whose reading and comprehension skills fall short. Those without good reading skills will lag farther and farther behind, facing difficulties in school and later on employment.
What can be done to ensure our children’s success, not only in their educational careers, but throughout life?
First we must understand that good reading ability grows from an environment rich with language. From the earliest moments of life, a child’s mind is receiving and processing every word heard. Children who are spoken to, or actively engaged in conversation with, the adults around them build vocabulary and learn sentence structure which will transfer to written language later in school.
Reading to children, even at the earliest ages, improves reading ability. The July/August 2006 issue of the journal Child Development cited studies of both English and non-English speaking parents who read to their infants and toddlers. These studies showed that English-speaking mothers who began reading to their children at an early age had toddlers with greater language comprehension, more expressive vocabularies, and higher cognitive scores by the age of two. Meanwhile, Spanish speaking mothers who read to their children everyday had three year olds with greater language and cognitive development compared to parents who did not read to their children. Researchers also found that reading and children’s vocabulary seemed to enhance each other beginning as early as 14 months. The more mothers read, the better the children’s vocabulary, which encouraged more reading. These findings imply that parent-child book reading and other early interventions can be used at a much younger age than had been earlier proposed.
But increased vocabulary isn’t the only benefit of reading to young children. Parents can draw the child’s attention to various letters and their associated sounds. As the child follows along he can begin to recognize letters. Reading together from a book helps the child to connect the words he or she hears to those printed on the page. The child begins to understand that written words have meanings. And most importantly, reading time creates a warm connection between the parent, the child, and reading. This positive association can make a life-long impression, encouraging reading for many years to come.


Teachers Connect 2006

Lecturers from California, USA

Chiangmai Mail Reporter
Teachers and personnel of Varee Chiang Mai School participated in the training program “Teachers Connect 2006” on July 14-18. The lecturers were led by Stan Huebert, educational lecturer and former educational supervisor in California and Judith Enns Szpor, also a teacher and lecturer from California, U.S., with good cooperation from Susy Peters, formerly an English teacher of Varee Chiang Mai School. The subject of the training program was educational motivation and the curriculum for English, Mathematics and Science. Also, there was instruction on techniques for the cultivation of good-behavior.

Teachers and personnel received certificates after the training program
This “Teachers Connect 2006” was an operational training program given by a group who set up a work shop for teaching Mathemetics and Science, creating motivation for students via learning activities, games, and songs and integrating the curriculum to cater for students’ needs.
The activities included motivation for Mathematics and Science provided by teachers about Maths, Games, Solar Systems, and Weather and Water. Moreover, the teachers participated in learning new teaching methods in the lecturers’ classes and the lecturers took note of the Math and Science teachers’ teaching methods in order to exchange ideas and techniques, with the idea of creating innovative teaching methods to foster good relationships between seminar participants and lecturers. There was a “Cowboy Night” party after the seminar and all teachers and personnel received certificates from the National Board of Certified Teachers (USA).