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HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

HIV/AIDS training for 14 representatives of 14 countries held in Chiang Mai

Pantip Plaza deals with any computer troubles

Relocating with children, part 2

Shopping at JJ Good Taste

New Orleans All Star Brass Band oncert scheduled for September

Rotary inaugurates peace and conflict studies for professionals

HIV/AIDS training for 14 representatives of 14 countries held in Chiang Mai

The trainees, representing 14 countries.

Nopniwat Krailerg
A training course on HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care for Children and Vulnerable Young People was held from July 24 to August 4 at the Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University, in cooperation with UNICEF and the Thailand International Development Cooperation Agency (TICA).
The aim of the course was to inform the trainees about the HIV/AIDS situation amongst teenagers and children, to exchange information about the disease in these two groups and to discuss ideas on how to prevent and control the disease.
The course also hoped to develop cooperative networks between the trainees and the host organisations. There were 20 trainees representing 14 countries from the South-East Asia region.
At the end of the course Assoc. Prof. Dr. Thanan Anumanratchaton, vice-president of Chiang Mai University, presented the trainees with certificates at a ceremony held in the Park Hotel, Chiang Mai.


Pantip Plaza deals with any computer troubles

Has the mother board on your computer ever stopped working? Has your computer ever been infected with a virus? Has your laptop screen ever suddenly gone blank? If you have ever experienced these or any other problems with your computer Pantip Plaza is probably the best place in Chiang Mai to get it repaired.

Specialist computer repair at Pantip Plaza.

Pantip Plaza features numerous shops, both large and small, that provide any computer service you care to mention. You can have your PC, laptop, or printer fixed, upgrade your computer or get knowledge on how to avoid computer problems from specialists, all at a reasonable price.
Some shops specialize in one particular area. The Main Board Service Shop, for example, on the second floor, will fix any problem with your computer’s main board for just 99 baht, and will return your money if the problem cannot be solved.
Both KPN and Morgan on the fourth floor will build computers according to your individual specifications.
PW Shop on the third floor will not only fix your computer, but also teaches how to fix computers to anyone who is interested.
WNK, Kodang, Chonun and Smart Tech Solutions all sell second hand computers.
No matter what your problem or question may be regarding computers, Pantip Plaza will be able to help in out in no time at all.
Pantip Plaza is located at Sang Tawan crossroads on Chang Klan Road, near the Night Bazaar. For more information phone 053 288383 ext. 104.


Relocating with children, part 2

Ann R. Schechter, Special Educational Needs teacher, Lanna International School
Relocating is stressful for everyone involved. It is often traumatic for children who have never experienced such a dramatic change in their lives and often have little say in the decision to move. Your child may need some time and special attention during this transition. Here are some suggestions to make the process less stressful for your family:
1. After moving day it is a good idea to get your child’s room in order before taking on the rest of the house. A regular schedule for meals and bedtime will also add a sense of familiarity for both you and your children. Give children chores to do so that they feel a part of the transition. Younger children can help unpack their things, older children can supervise the younger ones and help set up the new house. Also take time off from the flurry of moving to explore new sites around the neighborhood. You all deserve a break.
2. Set realistic expectations at school. Let academic study take a back seat for a while. In the early days following a move it is more important for children to make friends and learn about the school. Learning best takes place when your child feels comfortable and stable. Remember that he or she is learning a new culture, a new school system a new language and new friendship patterns. These are all forms of learning that may prove more important in life than the math or history facts in the classroom.
3. Regardless of their age, children need to make friends. The importance of friends goes well beyond having fun. Children who have difficulties making friends are more likely to encounter problems with learning in school, and have social difficulties throughout life. It is not the number of friends that is important, but the skills that come with making and keeping friends, such as sharing, cooperation, kindness and acceptance. If your child is having problems making new friends, take the initiative. Invite a classmate or his family over for a visit, or join a group activity.
4. If your child is experiencing difficulties for a prolonged period following the move a family therapist may be able to provide some helpful guidance.
5. Be proud of your children. They are accomplishing many important tasks in the early days of a transition. They will soon acclimatise academically, make friends and speak a new language (even if it is the local slang). Remember that children are resilient, flexible and creative. If they feel your love and support, they will be able to use these talents most effectively.


Shopping at JJ Good Taste

If you are looking for somewhere to buy top-quality handicraft products at a reasonable price the JJ Good Taste at JJ Market may be for you. The market is located on a new road at Khamthiang Market, one kilometre away from Sriphum Corner.

Modified hill tribe costume, available at JJ Good Taste Market.

Especially popular is the JJ Sidewalk Shopping Day that takes place every Friday, at which almost 130 stalls offer products similar to those found at Sunday’s Walking Street market.
JJ Good Taste offers 40 shops selling products such as ceramics, modified Lanna costumes, wooden furniture and much more. Apiradee Tantivejkul, project manager for JJ Good Taste said that prices on the products for sale at JJ Good taste were kept low by offering low rental fees for shops.
She added that in the near future the market will expand to provide restaurants and an art market on Saturday to display the works of Chiang Mai’s artists and art students.


New Orleans All Star Brass Band oncert scheduled for September

Preeyanoot Jittawong
The Faculty of Fine Arts, Chiang Mai University, is to stage a free jazz concert featuring “The New Orleans All Star Brass Band” at Chiang Mai University Convention Hall on September 25. The concert is scheduled to start at 7 p.m. and is to celebrate the occasion of HM the King’s 60th anniversary of his ascension to the throne.

The New Orleans All Star Brass Band

The New Orleans All Star Brass Band, also known as “The Survivors” have been performing together as a group since November 2005. The group was originally organised to thank several African and Middle-Eastern nations for their contributions to victims of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated New Orleans last year. The group consists of three generations of renowned brass and jazz musicians.
The event is a result of cooperation between Chiang Mai University, the US Embassy to Thailand and the US Consulate of Chiang Mai. The organisers hope to promote interest in arts and culture in Chiang Mai and to strengthen cultural ties between Thailand and the USA.


Rotary inaugurates peace and conflict studies for professionals

Local professionals can apply for program through local rotary clubs

A new Rotary-sponsored program teaching the theory and practice of professional mediation and conflict resolution began on July 3 at Chulalongkorn University. The new Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies Program is a three-month curriculum in peace studies, conflict resolution and mediation aimed at middle and upper-level professionals from government, non-governmental organisations, and the private sector. The program is offered through the university’s Rotary Center, sponsored by the Rotary Foundation.
The program is designed to meet the need for a regional peace studies curriculum in Southeast Asia. The program offers a reasonably-priced, intensive, short-term curriculum developed by international and regional experts on peace and conflict studies, who also teach the courses. Courses are taught in English. The Rotary Foundation expects each participant’s employer to cover the full cost of the program. However, the Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies Selection Committee does offer a limited number of full and partial fellowships for qualified applicants whose employers cannot afford the full cost. Completion of the program earns a Certificate in Peace and Conflict Studies from Chulalongkorn University.
Former Thailand Deputy Prime Minister Bhichai Rattakul, a past president of Rotary International, said, “I hope that through this program, peace is not just a piece of paper but a practical tool to end possible conflicts.”
The inaugural class is a diverse group of 15 students from 11 countries. Their ranks include mid-to-upper level government workers, NGO officers, educators, military and law enforcement officers, lawyers, media professionals and union leaders. “Participants are mature and enthusiastic individuals who have extensive experiences in various fields relating to peace and conflict,” explains Tom Woodhouse, a program lecturer who is also a professor at the University of Bradford in England.
Class member Zelie Pollon, from the United States, says the program already has taught her that conflict can be viewed as “an agent of change.”
Applications are currently being accepted for the January 2007 and July 2007 sessions. For more information or to obtain a Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies Program application form, interested individuals should contact their local Rotary clubs or email Bangkok.PeaceStudies @rotary.org. More detailed program information, including profiles of current participants, is available at www.rotarychula.org
Rotary also offers a separate two-year, graduate-level, peace studies program at six Rotary Centers for International Studies based at major universities in Argentina, Australia, England, Japan and the United States. The program admits up to 60 fellows each year. For more information, visit www.rotary.org
Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders united worldwide who provide humanitarian services and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are approximately 1.2 million Rotarians who are members of more than 32,000 Rotary clubs in nearly 170 countries.