ACADEMIA NUTS
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Lanna student wins Global Citizenship Award

Spend Sunday with a dog

CMIS Sharp Shooters

On learning and thinking: improving reading skills in elementary school children

Lanna student wins Global Citizenship Award

Jenifer Angkana Davis, an 11th grader at Lanna International School, received the EARCOS (East Asia Regional Council of Overseas Schools) Global Citizenship award at a special assembly on Tuesday.

Jenifer receives the Global Citizenship EARCOS award.

This award is presented to a student who best represents the desirable qualities of a “global citizen”: open-mindedness; concern for others; the ability to relate to and work with people of all ages, occupations and nationalities; and personal commitment to community improvement and projects to “make the world a better place.” More than 45 schools in East Asia submitted nominations for this prestigious award.
During this school year, Jenifer has been president of the Student Council. She is also a member of the Honor Roll; Lanna Community Service; varsity volleyball, basketball, soccer and futsal teams; and musical ensembles, in which she sang and played violin, piano and guitar. She has been able to balance two qualities which rarely fit so well together: popularity, and good management of diverse groups and goals. Under her leadership, the Lanna Student Council has become an active and effective representative of Lanna students’ wishes and choices.
EARCOS is an organization representing 101 member schools in East Asia, from China to Indonesia, Japan to the Philippines. Students in these schools total more than 54,000 pre-K to 12th grade students.


Spend Sunday with a dog

Karin Hawelka
There was a lot of fun to be had at the ‘open door’ day of the newly opened dog shelter ‘Care For Dogs’. Kids and adults cuddled cute puppies, watched dogs playing around, shopped for dog products, and ate delicious Phat Thai and lip-smacking ice-cream. Around 65 guests came to see the shelter on the occasion of the international “Homeless Animals Day”, August 20th.

Around 65 guests came to see the shelter on the occasion of the international “Homeless Animals Day”, August 20th.

The abbot of the neighbouring village temple of Wiang Dong opened the ceremony by blessing the shelter. Afterwards a drawing competition drew a large group of children and teenagers. The results of the drawing competition were widely admired and now decorate the walls of the shelter. The three winners of each age group received prices such as cuddly toy dog and a book by HM the King about his favourite adopted street dog “Tongdaeng”.
“Care for Dogs” is a newly established dog rescue group in Chiang Mai. Their aim is to improve the life of street- and temple dogs by organising sterilisations, vaccinations, and medical care. Their shelter offers a home for approximately 40 homeless dogs and puppies where they are taken care of until they find a new loving home. Sterilised dogs are kept at the shelter for after-care.
Anyone who is interested in adopting, volunteering, or supporting the group with donations or dog food, can contact tel. 01 907 32 60, email [email protected] or visit www.carefordogs.org

The results of the drawing competition were widely admired and now decorate the walls of the shelter.


CMIS Sharp Shooters

Physical training at ROTC.

Nicki Gamble, CMIS Admissions Officer
Twenty-three CMIS boys in Grades 10 to 12, together with teachers Ajarn Worawan Nimitpongkul and Ajarn Rungrat Yongprasert, recently traveled to the military camp of the 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment at Chiang Dao where they joined over 1400 boys for an ROTC training camp.
For ten days, the boys were immersed in rigorous military training which included weapons and marksmanship instruction, military strategies, and physical challenges such as obstacle courses, all designed to help develop skill and discipline.
The CMIS community is very proud of its hardworking boys in ROTC, and wishes to extend special congratulations to the four members of our contingent who won prestigious marksmanship awards: Ricky Gommert, Palapol (Tong) Teriyapirom, Thanvara Ruedeesuksakul, and Teerawat (Poy) Teriyapirom.


On learning and thinking: improving reading skills in elementary school children

Ann R. Schechter, Teacher of Special Education, Lanna International School
In a previous article I discussed the many benefits of reading to young children. Reading aloud provides a model of fluent reading for children and should continue throughout your child’s school career. Reading also increases children’s awareness of their world, expands their vocabulary, and provides familiarity with written language. Children then find it easier to read, and become more interested in books. If you have young children and want to learn more about the joys of reading aloud, I recommend Mem Fox’s “Reading Magic - Why Reading Aloud to Our Children Will Change Their Lives Forever.”
Many families enjoy a 20 to 30 minute read-aloud time just before bedtime. Start reading aloud to your children on a daily basis when they are babies and keep reading to them (no one is too old to enjoy being read to). As they get to be independent readers, continue this practice, while also giving your children time to read aloud to you. Another idea for encouraging reading aloud with older children is to have a family “Reader’s Theater” night. Having parents and children participate in reading a short play can produce a marvelous evening of togetherness.
Create a comfortable reading space for your child away from the distractions of TV or other family members. Good lighting is important, as is a cozy seat. The more comfortable the child is, the longer he will sit and read.
Weekly visits to the library are another wonderful way to encourage family reading. When your children are old enough, they can get their own library cards. Bring them to see the librarian who will be happy to show you and your children around the children’s section and teach them how to use the card catalog, which is now often computerised. If your children have a favorite author or special interests, be sure to ask the librarian where to locate appropriate books.
Take your time so your children won’t feel rushed. Encourage them to browse, and help them find the books they want. Asking the librarian for suggestions is a good habit. Many libraries and book stores offer a weekly story-time. Younger children will enjoy the story, giving older members of the family time to find something interesting to take home.
At home, discuss the books your children are reading, both in school and on their own. Relate events in your family to stories they have read or heard.
Movies, too, can help encourage reading, but some movie versions of children’s books are better than others, so be sure and read the reviews first. Compare and contrast movie and book versions of the same story.
Books also give children valuable opportunities to develop practical skills. There are some excellent children’s cookbooks available, for example, and cooking together can be lots of fun. Reading and following directions are good practice for your children, and cooking is a skill they will use throughout their lives.
Purchase books that you know will interest your child. A chapter book from a favorite series or a reference book on a topic your child enjoys learning about makes a great gift. A subscription to a magazine your child is interested in will encourage reading throughout the year.
I also think it is important to buy your children a good dictionary and use it regularly. When I was growing up, any time my brother or I asked what a word meant, we had to look it up in the dictionary, and then we would all discuss it. It was a great way to build our vocabularies and pique our interest in words.
As children get older, discuss their reading choices with them. Older children often identify with characters with personalities and experiences similar to their own. Talking about the books your children are reading can therefore provide valuable insight into their world. Recommend books to your child that you really enjoyed and feel would be appropriate for your child to read. After your child has read the book, discuss it. You may be surprised by what you hear.
You can pass your love of reading onto your child. Even when reading is not one of your passions, you can still show your children that books are keys to learning about life, and can also become good friends.