Vol. VII No. 16 - Tuesday
April 15, - April 21, 2008



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by Saichon Paewsoongnern


MAILBAG
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Thai traffic rules

About respect and rules

 

Thai traffic rules

Dear Chiang Mai Mail;
When I am riding my motorbike with my Thai lady on the back, I notice that the traffic laws in Thailand, according to my Thai lady, are different to Europe. Maybe this is what causes the high number of accidents.
Red light. For me this means stop and wait in they queue with the other traffic until the green light appears. My Thai lady says: Can go. Never mind. She gets angry when I sit and wait in the queue, saying motorbikes are allowed to push to the front of the queue and turn onto Sukhumvit/other road, regardless of the light/traffic.
Thick white line in middle of the road - no crossing this line to overtake in Europe. My Thai lady says: Can overtake - never mind.
One way streets. In Europe these are one way. Other way cannot use. My Thai lady says never mind, motorbike can go.
Any Road: motorised food vendors - Not allowed in Europe. Here an absolute pain in the butt. They stop anywhere, drive slowly, slow the traffic.
Priority - Is it Priority to the right, to the left, to the oncoming traffic. Not very clear.
Helmet - Europe. Need helmet every journey. My Thai lady says: Never mind, not far, no have police check, not need.
I think what is needed is more education of motorists and driving lessons in schools before age of 16 (many leave after that), and more stringent controls of people who break the rules.
Maybe these differences between Thai and foreign motoring laws are what cause the accidents.
Best regards,
Matthew
Ed’s Note: We assume the above to be a parody, as none of these differences actually exist, legally. You must stop at red lights, you must wear a helmet at all times when riding a motorcycle, etc., and just because a few local riders choose to put their lives in danger by ignoring both common sense and the law does not mean everyone should do this. Matthew is correct in stating that more education is needed.

 

About respect and rules

Sirs,
All the time I hear farangs on permanent vacation complaining about having to deal with the reality of life in Thailand. “Dutchie” wants the people at the immigration office to show him respect even though he showed them the disrespect by showing up in their workplace wearing some sleeveless 100 baht T-shirt. He acts surprised when they ask him to leave and try again. I wonder if “Dutchie” would wear the same shirt to conduct official business in his own country. No, probably not. Even though there would be no published dress code requirements he would have the common sense to know better. The only respect that was lost in the immigration office “Dutchie” was your self respect.
Patrick Lane
Japan



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