Art, Music & Culture
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

CMU presents the Thai-Japan Contemporary Arts Exhibition

Essentials of the Portrait

A Winter Pot-Pourri – an Evening of Choral Music

 

CMU presents the Thai-Japan Contemporary Arts Exhibition

Thattchai Hongphaeng (2nd left) with his mixed-media exhibit.

Michael Davies
Last week saw the opening of the Thai–Japanese Contemporary Arts Exhibition at Chiang Mai University’s Faculty of Fine Arts.

Tanji from Japan, shown with her exhibit, ‘Line’.
The exhibition is open to the public until the end of December from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m, with free admission. Exhibits include ceramics, woodwork, stone carving and mixed media sculptures from Thailand, Japan, Canada and Ireland.
Professor Thattchai Hongphaeng, head of the faculty’s sculpture department for 12 years, is exhibiting his mixed-media piece, with Yasuhiko Sunagawa from Japan, who has exhibited in Tokyo, Israel and China, presenting a stone sculpture. Another notable Japanese sculptress is Tanji, who studied at Okinawa Art University and is planning for her first solo exhibition in Tokyo next year. Her exhibit is made from iron, a traditional and highly regarded medium in Japan, and is entitled ‘Line’.

 

Essentials of the Portrait

A 5-day painting workshop at ArtSpace on 7

Laura Spector
During this five day comprehensive workshop, students from beginning to intermediate levels will review various techniques and materials used to paint a portrait. Participants will work from a live model as well as create a self-portrait.
The workshops will take a glimpse at the history of portrait painting, from the ancients to the masters, as well as contemporary artists who capture the human condition through the sitters they paint.
Portrait from
a Live Model:
Portraiture is the art of representing the physical or psychological likeness of a real or imaginary individual. From earliest times the portrait has been considered a means to immortality. Many cultures have attributed magical properties to the portrait: symbolization of the majesty or authority of the subject, substitution for a deceased individual’s living presence or depicting the soul of the living subject.
We will be taking a journey of creating an unspoken dialogue between the artist and the model. As you create, you will begin to determine how subjective your journey may be, how much you can see into your model and what you learn about yourself along the way.
The Self Portrait:
Two contrary objectives characterize portrait art in all cultures: the inclination to represent the subject accurately and the desire to transform or idealize the subject. This conflict is particularly revealed in the self-portrait, the genre that gives the artist the greatest freedom from external constraints.
Because the artist is his or her own cheapest and most available model, the self-portrait is the best opportunity to make a favourable statement or the most penetrating revelation of character of which he or she is capable. More deeply acquainted with this subject than with any other, artists are nevertheless forced to view themselves as mirror images and, as with less immediate subjects, through the distorting glass of their understanding.
Students will explore hands-on methods of how to interpret drawings and sketches in preparation for a painting. You will learn how to activate a composition onto a canvas, techniques of painting textures and light, basic color theories to work from, how to interpret the most from your live model in order to translate it into paint. All students will leave with several sketches, at least 2 completed paintings, and materials to continue painting on their own.
Note: Laura Spector has been a professional artist for over 15 years, and has been short-listed for the Sovereign Asian Art Award. She is acknowledged as being in the top 30 artists of Asia for two years in a row with her artwork, which is based in portraiture.
Painting Workshop Dates: 5 day workshop/ 3 hours per day-2pm – 5:30pm
December Session: Wednesday, 17, Friday 19, Monday, 22, Tuesday, 26, Monday 29. January Session: Monday, 5, Wednesday 7, Monday 12, Wednesday 14, Friday 16. For further details or to book, please contact Laura on 085-622-607, email on [email protected], or visit the website at www. chadwickandspector.com


A Winter Pot-Pourri – an Evening of Choral Music

Jean-Pierre Kirkland
The Saisuree Hall at Payap University was the venue on Friday, December 12 for a wide ranging, interesting and professional presentation of choral music by the Chiang Mai Choral Society International, with delightful support from the Spirit House Singers.  As Glynn Morgan the conductor announced at the start, there was no theme running through the program, these were pieces that the choir liked to sing.  And sing their hearts out they did, much to the delight of the near full hall.
Dressed in black with beautiful green sashes worn as scarves, sashes or belts, the choir sang a set of religious works with precision and dignity.  Boyce’s Alleluia was sung with clarity and energy; Mozart’s delectable Ave Verum Corpus was sung with feeling and rich harmony; and the stirring Glorias allowed the sopranos to excel with great conviction.
Some fine solo performances were heard from Sitoni Kimura and David Geddes, and there was a delightful and beautifully sung duet with Sitoni and her daughter Ayuni performing You Raise Me Up in a sweet and angelic interpretation.
Music from Broadway provided a real contrast, as well as some humour, when, for example Mark Walder appeared as the ‘Matchmaker’ in the song of that title from Fiddler on the Roof; the choir was equally at home with the lighter and more flamboyant style as well as with the more serious and reflective classical or secular music.
Generally, the choir sang with precision although there was a muffled entry or two especially at the start of Va Pensiero, or the Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves – however, that was soon put right by the expressive feeling and rich harmonies they achieved in this most evocative chorus by Verdi.
The Spirit House Singers sang three medieval English carols, capturing well, for example, the awe and wonder in the Coventry Carol and the highly spirited essence of the Boar’s Head Carol.  Three short festive pieces followed on, with an especially delightful and rich version of O Holy Night, better known to some in its original title of ‘Minuit Chretiens.’  This was sung with zeal and passion.  An arrangement of We Wish You a Merry Christmas by David Crisp, the conductor of the Spirit House Singers brought the evening to a close as both choirs joined together in this strident and powerful rendition.
Those on stage, including the accompanist, Leona Moss, performed with skill, devotion and a great love of their work.  It is a pity that some of the audience did not fully respect or support this, as over 50 people arrived late and stumbled in when the choir was performing, and others, especially some of the farang men, seemed attired in wear that was more suitable for use on a beach.  Nevertheless, this was a lovely evening of music performed with devotion, joy and skill, and very obviously a great deal of rehearsal time had gone into making this event the success it was.