Vol. VIII No. 3 - Tuesday
January 20 - January 26, 2009



Home
Automania
News
Book-Movies-Music
Columns
Community
Art, Music & Culture
Happenings
Dining Out & Entertainment
Features
Social Scene
Sports
Travel & Tourism
Chiang Mai FeMail
Daily Horoscope
Cartoons
Happy Birthday HM Queen Sirikit
Current Movies in
Chiangmai's Cinemas
Advertising Rates
Classifieds
Back Issues
Updated every Tuesday
by Saichon Paewsoongnern


Chiang Mai FeMail  by Elena Edwards
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Care for Dogs - a volunteer’s experience

Feeling not so good? Take some honey, honey - with cinnamon

Happy first Birthday, Chiang Mai Friends

Global Warming - doomed planet or Gaia’s immune system?

 

Care for Dogs - a volunteer’s experience

There are many people here who volunteer to help many different organisations, all of whom give their time and energy generously to make the lives of those less fortunate more comfortable. Some volunteers even come from their home countries to Chiang Mai because a particular charity ‘calls’ to them, to stay for shorter periods of time and do as much as they can.

Sophie from Singapore, with two of the local Care for Dogs volunteers during her stay in Chiang Mai.

Recently, Care for Dogs were very pleased to welcome Sophie from Singapore, who came here specifically to volunteer at the shelter, having found the website, read all the information and stories, and felt compelled to come and help out for a while. She got in touch with the shelter, accommodation was arranged in a nearby village, and, once she had arrived, she went to the shelter every day during her stay. Marvellous! The following is what she wrote to Care for Dogs after her stay.
“Happy New Year! I’m back in Singapore, back to the hot weather and work. I really miss the days I spent with the dogs, time seemed to pass so quickly and every day there was something to look forward to. After seeing the dogs at the shelter and looking at my own here at home, I wish I can tell my dog and cats how fortunate they are. They have someone to give TLC everyday, whereas the dogs at the shelter are forever looking forward to someone visiting them and showering them with some love and cuddles.
“I still remember Oreo sitting right next to me, leaning against me when I was indoors sorting out the collars and leashes. I can’t wait to come back to see them again.
“How are the puppies? Are they growing up strong and healthy? They looked so young and vulnerable without their mothers. I can’t imagine how they would have ended up if you guys hadn’t brought them back to the shelter. I really wasn’t expecting to see so many young puppies when I decided to volunteer at Care for Dogs.
“Maybe it’s also one of those rare experiences for the shelter? I wish I could come back to help out with the adoption drive, it would be nice to see the pups go to their very own homes. But my part-time classes are starting next weeks so I can’t get away.
“But I wish you all well, and miss you, and to all the dogs and puppies I wish happiness and homes!”

 

Feeling not so good? Take some honey, honey - with cinnamon

Readers may have noticed that we often suggest naturally occurring substances which are recommended to improve our health and vitality, in spite of the fact that we now live in a much healthier and less stressful environment than did most of us in our home countries.
Here in Asia, the tradition of natural and folk medicine survives and is trusted, as are many other non-invasive forms of healing. Let’s face it, Asia is where we now live, and its cultural and medicinal heritage may well open new horizons for us - if we let it.
The tips below concern honey and cinnamon, and the remedies themselves sound delicious, particularly on toast. So, even if we are in good health, we can treat ourselves …and organic honey is so easily and cheaply available here!
Honey and cinnamon, separately, have long been recommended by holistic practitioners as remedies for various conditions, in combination they may well be even more useful, and, of course, have no side-effects. For example, a paste of honey and cinnamon, spread as a more delicious alternative to the usual jam or marmalade on your breakfast toast, has been claimed to help people with high cholesterol reduce those levels and therefore their risk of a heart attack, by revitalising and unblocking older arteries and veins. It may also relieve breathlessness and strengthen the heartbeat. And even if it doesn’t, or you don’t have such problems, it sounds absolutely delicious!
Those with high cholesterol can also use two tablespoons of honey and three teaspoons of cinnamon together, mixed in 16 fluid ounces of weak tea water, and taken three times a day.
If arthritis is a problem, try two tablespoons of honey with one small teaspoon of cinnamon in hot water morning and night. A European university study using this recipe found that arthritic joints responded very well, resulting in reduced pain and improved mobility.
The common cold, however severe its onset, may retreat more quickly with a honey and cinnamon mixture - remember when our mothers used to give us honey and lemon (with or without a little whisky added)? Try one tablespoon of warm honey mixed with a little cinnamon, daily for three days. This will also benefit upset stomachs. If you are susceptible to indigestion, two tablespoons of honey sprinkled with cinnamon and taken before you eat may well be the answer.
Basically, it would seem that both substances have the ability to strengthen the human immune system; honey in particular is of great benefit due to the large amount of vitamins and iron which it contains. Research suggests that its constant use strengthens the white blood corpuscles, which fight bacterial and viral diseases. It is also excellent for reviving a tired body which is suffering from low blood sugar, as the form of sugar in honey is much more easily assimilated than commercial sugars.


Happy first Birthday, Chiang Mai Friends

Here in Chiang Mai, time seems to fly much more quickly …surely it can’t be a whole year since the party which launched Chiang Mai Friends’ Group? A lot has happened within the group during the past year - the best, of course, being the new friends we all made, and the projects we got involved in.
For me, the highlight was being part of the small group who joined in the Loy Krathong parade from Thapae Gate to the Chiang Mai administration offices - I felt, perhaps for the first time, truly part of this city - ‘Kon Chiang Mai’, as the Mayor had said.
The Friends’ first birthday party will be held on January 22 at the JJ Market Hall opposite the Kam Thieng flower market, from 5.30 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. Welcome guests at this celebration of friendship will include the Mayor, the director of the Tourist Authority of Thailand, several Honorary Consuls and representatives from Immigration and the police.
At the last meeting, members decided that the party would have a ‘pot-luck’ element, as well as other goodies to eat, and entertainments will add to the enjoyment of the evening. Everyone, members or not, is welcome to come and celebrate - we will all be looking forward to the activities of the group’s second year, its new website, and the new friends we will make.
Chiang Mai Friends’ Group is, quite simply, a group of caring people - an eclectic mix of Thai and foreigners - that like to meet, talk and share information. Its main purpose is to exchange interests between cultures as well as making integration a great deal easier for foreigners who come to live in Chiang Mai. The transition between one’s country of origin and Thailand can be difficult; Chiang Mai Friends’ Group helps to ease the process, with both foreigners and Thai people helping newcomers to adjust and settle down.


Global Warming - doomed planet or Gaia’s immune system?

Given that the weather and its constant changes are nowadays invariably linked to global warming and the human race’s recent involvement in this syndrome since, it is claimed, the industrial revolution in the Western world which began some 200 years ago, we thought that the following discovery might be of interest. It doesn’t let the human race off the hook completely or deny that global warming is a fact, but does give a fascinating new slant on what may be the planet’s own defence against whatever humans have done to disturb its balance.
Ground-breaking research by scientists working in the Great Southern Ocean close to Antarctica has led to a discovery which may validate the long-held theory that the planet Earth, as a living organism, is capable of adjusting itself to adverse conditions in a similar manner to our bodies’ immune systems, which adjust in order to conquer disease.
A natural process linked to melting icebergs in the area has been observed, in that miniscule particles of iron contained in melt water, feed algae when released. The resultant ‘bloom’ absorbs carbon dioxide, then sinks to the bottom of the ocean, locking the harmful greenhouse gas away for hundreds of years.
The stimulation of algae growth caused by the release of iron has been scientifically acknowledged for some while, but live experiments have been prohibited due to concerns that crucial ecosystems might be damaged. However, now that the process has been confirmed to have occurred naturally in the Antarctic region throughout the planet’s history, an experiment will be allowed to take place in the Great Southern Ocean.
Later this month, scientists will release tons of iron sulphate in order to create a huge algae bloom, which will be studied for its ability to fall several miles into the deep ocean, thus locking the gas away. However, if the algae sinks just several hundred feet, the gas will be released back into the atmosphere.
Calculations have shown that if the experiment is successful, seeding the 20 million square miles of the Great Southern Ocean (whose water is unusually low in iron) would result in the trapping of one eighth of all annual emissions of greenhouse gases, and have also shown that, for every 1 percentage point increase in the amount of ice breaking off and melting, a further 26 million tons of CO2 is removed from the atmosphere. This suggests that, the warmer temperatures become, the harder the planet works to redress the balance.
The project, however, is highly controversial, with experts warning that seeding would affect surrounding areas as well, with unknown effects on complicated ecosystems.
In a further report concerning research being carried out in the Arctic, it has been discovered that there is a rapid rebound in the measurable amount of floating sea ice, bringing it back to levels last seen in 1979. Growth since the refreeze after the summer melt began last September shows the highest rate of increase on record.
Sea ice is a barometer of changing conditions, due to its speed of response. Despite predictions made in early 2008 that the Artic would be free of sea ice by the summer, the speed and extent of the freeze indicates lower overall temperatures, with weaker wind patterns. In May, concerns over disappearing sea ice led the U.S. to list the polar bear as a threatened species, despite objections from experts who claimed the animal’s numbers were increasing.



Chiangmai Mail Publishing Co. Ltd.
189/22 Moo 5, T. Sansai Noi, A. Sansai, Chiang Mai 50210
THAILAND
Tel. 053 852 557, Fax. 053 014 195
Editor: 087 184 8508
E-mail: [email protected]
www.chiangmai-mail.com
Administration: [email protected]
Website & Newsletter Advertising: [email protected]

Copyright © 2004 Chiangmai Mail. All rights reserved.
This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Advertisement