Chiang Mai FeMail  by Elena Edwards
HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

Pyjamas, pedicures-and a lot of fun at the CM Soroptimists’ anniversary

A ‘Mindfulness Day’ in Mae Rim

Is the ‘holy grail’ of an extended, healthy human lifespan creeping nearer?

Emotional Freedom Technique…an interesting self-help tool

 

Pyjamas, pedicures-and a lot of fun at the CM Soroptimists’ anniversary

Alicia Evans
Pajamas or Pyjamas – whichever way one chooses to spell them—were plentiful and diverse at the recent Soroptimist International Chiangmai event, entitled ‘Pajamas and Pedicures’, held on May 26 at Spa Na Tandee. From traditional, (and modest), Lanna- style night gowns, to red and red-hot satin nighties, the pyjamas were unique and worn with spirit and courage by the attendees—some ladies had to walk a few blocks to reach the spa, because of the remote parking situation! All in all, forty ladies from all sectors of Chiang Mai donned their favorite jammies or lounge wear and gathered at the contemporary boutique spa for an evening of pampering with classic pedicures or foot/neck massages. They were treated to a sampling of healthy hors d’oeuvres, organic wines and fresh fruit smoothies catered by Café Pandau. To die-for homemade cupcakes, prepared by a Soroptimist member, completed the celebratory mood of the evening.

Ooooohhh…that feels good! Soroptimist members and their guests enjoying a relaxing foot massage while benefiting the Single Mothers’ Project
Two prizes were awarded for ‘best/cutest’ pajamas, judged by Soroptimist members, Pim Kemasingki, Liz Lovett and Nancy Ng. The lucky runner-up, Celeste Tolibas-Holland, won ‘Victoria’s Secret’ fragrances for her lovely, hand-embroidered robe from El Salvador. Winner, Anchalee Kalmapijit, wore a purple, traditional Lanna-style night gown, and bravely completed her outfit with curlers in her hair! Her ‘twin sister’ for a night, Nopawan Komyoung, wore the same, but also had her teddy bear in tow. They won Victoria Jackson lip products and Lancome make-up products.

We’ve all heard of ‘doormen’ – but doesn’t the president of the Chiang Mai chapter of Soroptimists International, Cory Corymans, (left), make an imposing ‘doorlady’!
Several ladies were lucky winners of donated door prizes, including facial massage/treatment donated by Soroptimist member Natnicha Kusumote of Spa Na Tandee; two bottles of organic wine and two 500 baht meal vouchers donated by Soroptimist member Noriko Yabata of Café Pandau. Also up for grabs by lucky winners was a BBQ dinner for two and a buffet lunch for two at La Gritta Restaurant, both prizes donated by the Amari Rincome Hotel, and 2 bottles of Spirulina tablets donated by Cory Croymans, president of SICM. Soroptimist International Chiang Mai is most grateful for the continued support offered by these esteemed community establishments and members. SICM would also like to thank all the ladies who attended the event and helped to make it so much fun, all in the name of charity.
This event marked the 2nd anniversary of the chartering of Soroptimist International Chiang Mai, one of three clubs in Thailand, and one of 30,000 clubs worldwide. Soroptimist International aims to inspire action and create opportunities to transform the lives of women and girls through a global network as well as local and international partnerships. This small event was another way that Chiang Mai’s local club ‘took action in style’. Proceeds from the event will go to Soroptimist International Chiang Mai’s Single Mothers Project. For more information about SICM, please contact president Cory Croymans at [email protected] asianhealingartscenter.com . SICM is delighted to welcome new members.

 

A ‘Mindfulness Day’ in Mae Rim

Nausicaa
The only sounds were birds, bugs and the soft sound of the breeze in the garden. And yet—fifteen people were meeting there, under the roof of a patio. Eyes closed and breathing softly, they were simply enjoying a session of sitting meditation.

Every third Sunday of the month, farang and Thai alike meet each other for a Day of Mindfulness. They meditate according to the Plum Village tradition, following the teachings of its founder, the Vietnamese monk Thich Nhat Hanh. He offers a modern light on traditional meditation practice, by introducing mindfulness in everyday life and activities.
Days of Mindfulness are thus not traditional meditation practices. Although they do usually include the obvious sitting and walking meditation sessions, the focus is also on practices such as ‘deep relaxation’, ‘eating mindfully’, (each participant brings vegetarian food, shared with the group), dharma discussions, some songs or – as in last Sunday – a mindful tea ceremony.
The Chiang Mai Plum Village sangha also meets at the Yoga Studios, 65/1 Arak Rd, every Thursday evening between 7.30 p.m. and 9 p.m. for 3 meditation sessions—a sitting guided meditation, a walking meditation and a silent sitting meditation.
Everyone is welcome either on Days of Mindfulness or to the Thursday meditation practice. For more information, please email [email protected]


Is the ‘holy grail’ of an extended, healthy human lifespan creeping nearer?

Elena Edwards
The Croonan Prize Lecture, (the UK’s premier lecture in the biological sciences), given last week at the Royal Society’s premises in London by an eminent British professor in the field of healthy ageing, announced the discovery of key genes which control longevity, bringing the prevention of ageing ever closer.
Professor Partridge, the director of University College London’s Institute of Healthy Ageing and recipient of the 2009 Woman of Outstanding Achievement award, given by the UK Resource Centre for Women in Science, Engineering and Technology, hopes that the new discovery will aid research in the fields of prevention and treatment of age- related diseases, allowing people to live longer and retain their health. The professor, who has also recently been awarded a research grant by Research into Ageing, stated that, ‘The new discoveries about ageing have raised the prospect of increasing the number of years that people enjoy in good health, and that of developing broad-spectrum preventative medicines for the diseases of ageing.’ She added that, during the last 10 years, research into the biology of ageing has developed very quickly, and expects that, during the next 10 years, major discoveries about the cellular and biochemical mechanisms that control the ageing process will be made.
The recently announced research results were based on the discovery that mutations in single genes which extend the lives of mice, worms and fruit flies, seem to play the same role in humans. The mutations also have the effect of slowing the progress of age-related disease. Professor Partridge also believes that pathways in the human body which are utilised for the processing of nutrients also offer hope for the manipulation of the human lifespan, by means of drug-induced replication of a restricted diet, which is known to increase lifespan in animals. For example, reducing the activity of a particular insulin/insulin-like growth factor molecular signalling pathway in mammals’ fatty tissue, which regulates blood sugar levels, growth and metabolic response to food intake, could result in an extension of lifespan by as much as 50 %. Genetic variants in humans of these and similar genes have been proven to be associated with lifespan.


Emotional Freedom Technique…an interesting self-help tool

Elena Edwards
In these stressful times, many of us are looking for a way to move forward, but are unsure about which method, from the many self and guided help programmes here in Chiang Mai, would suit us best. Some months ago, we published a personal experience story, sent in by one of our regular readers, about a new and increasingly popular and successful pain relief technique, based on tapping the body’s acupuncture points and the painful areas themselves. Interestingly, a similar method, Emotional Freedom Technique, (EFT), is now available in the city, and claims to deal with negativity and its effects on our natural desires to ‘move on’ and to grow emotionally.
Billed as ‘the most exciting therapy and self-help tool available’, and used by therapists and individuals alike, EFT is a form of acupuncture by tapping, rather than by inserting needles, based on the body’s energy-flow systems. The disrupting or blocking of the natural flow of energy around our bodies is believed to result in emotional negativity, leading to stress and ill-health; EFT is reputed to help sufferers clear these blockages by gently tapping one’s own acupuncture points while concentrating on specific disturbing events or issues. It’s an interesting theory.
Two introductory workshops are due to be given by an EFT practitioner and trainer, Jaz Goven, at Siri Wattana here in Chiang Mai; the first, on June 20 between 9 am and 12 noon will show how EFT can help resolve emotional and psychological issues. The second, on June 21 between the same times, is entitled, ‘I Need to be Perfect’ , and will explain that this compulsion comes from an internalised sense of not being good enough, leading to that impossible aspiration, the pursuit of perfection! It will then demonstrate how EFT can help you refocus and develop.
The cost of each workshop is 600 baht…for further information, please call Ayesha on 053-802-696. If you’re feeling both negative and flush, this might well be worth trying!