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Metro Bar opens

Swine Flu (A H1N1 2009) - Infectivity and Virulence

Metro Bar opens

New venue on Soi Wiang Bua

Todd Kassap, 3rd left, G.M. of the newly-opened Metro Bar and Lounge hosted a press party on Saturday June 13 to introduce local media and their friends to the luxurious style and atmosphere of this new multi-purpose venue. 2nd left, is Phitsanu Thepthong, editor of Chiang Mai Mail, with members of the local media.

CMM reporters
A smart new lounge bar opening in Chiang Mai would always be welcome. Given the present economic downturn, it is doubly welcome, especially when it is part of an ambitious refurbishment of a landmark venue – Adam’s Apple – scheduled to re-open in a few weeks time. Located in busy Soi Wiang Bua, opposite the Lotus Hotel, the new bar is owned and run by an American, Todd, who is obviously optimistic that the city’s current tourist doldrums will soon be a thing of the past.

A view of the new entertainment venue, the Metro Bar and Lounge, located on Soi Wiang Bua, Chotana Road.
Metro is a fairly high tech concept, though far from dauntingly so. Comfortable white leather arm chairs and decent-sized tables contribute to a light and airy feel, which is accentuated by the extra-high ceilings. A superbly well stocked bar, (is there any drink they don’t have?), completes the note of elegant indulgence. Adam’s Apple will- as before – be aimed at the ‘Gay Chiang Mai ’community, but Metro, (suggesting either the Paris ‘underground system’ or Metrosexuality), can be described as either gay friendly or straight friendly, depending on which side of the fence one is on.
Either way, it is yet one more pleasant ‘watering hole’, for those in search of a smart but friendly environment and joins the well established Glass Onion and Soho and the more recently opened La Vie en Rose in providing just that.

 

Swine Flu (A H1N1 2009) - Infectivity and Virulence

Dr. Iain Corness
When looking at any epidemic it is important to differentiate between “infectivity” and “virulence”.
Infectivity
When any infection spreads quickly throughout the world, its infectivity is high. The World Health Organization (WHO) has several levels in looking at the infectivity, with the top one being Level 6 and this is called a “pandemic”.
WHO has now declared Swine Flu to be a pandemic (Level 6). WHO’s declaration of a Level 6 pandemic simply means the virus is spreading across the world.
WHO chief Dr Margaret Chan said the pandemic declaration did not mean the virus was causing more severe illness or more deaths. The WHO levels do not predict the severity of a virus.
It means the swine flu virus is spreading in at least two regions of the world with rising cases being seen in the UK, Australia, Japan and Chile. Currently, it has been detected in 74 countries.
As I write this, there has been around 30,000 cases identified globally, but there are probably more.
Virulence
The virulence of any virus refers to just how powerful it is, and ultimately, how likely it is to be lethal.
Out of the 30,000 cases of Swine Flu, there have been less than 150 deaths world-wide, so whilst the virus is spreading, there is currently no evidence that it is very virulent, or increasing in its severity.
It should be remembered that every year in the United States, on average: 5 to 20 percent of the population gets the ‘flu’; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu-related complications; and about 36,000 people die from flu-related causes.
Compare that with the 150 deaths from A H1N1 2009.
Diagnosis and
Treatment
Rapid blood tests are available to test for Seasonal Flu A and Flu B. Those who test positive for Flu A can then be further screened for A H1N1 2009.
There is medication which can be taken to reduce the symptoms of all viral flu infections.
Immunization is recommended for Flu A and Flu B, though currently there is no vaccine for A H1N1 2009, but this is currently being developed.
General precautions to avoid Flu
A 2009 Flu
Influenza is thought to spread mainly person-to-person through ‘droplet infection’ by coughing or sneezing of infected people.
Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hands cleaners are also effective.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread that way.
Stay home if you get sick. Stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.
Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other social distancing measures.