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Fabulous dresses, diamonds, spas – the Amari Rincome’s Wedding Fair

Cultural Canvas Thailand keeps on creating!

 

Fabulous dresses, diamonds, spas – the Amari Rincome’s Wedding Fair

 

Cultural Canvas Thailand keeps on creating!

Volunteers, mothers and community members, pictured inside the new meditation room built from glass bottle and mud at Wildflower Home.

CMM reporters
Cultural Canvas Thailand, (CCT), a small and specialised Chiang Mai based NGO working with disadvantaged children in the field of creative art therapy, have recently set up an online ‘Canvas Volunteer Art’ blog at http://volunteercct.blogspot .com/ The new web pages, created and run by the volunteers, will allow direct access to detailed information about Cultural Canvas’s creative outreach projects. The blog will host personal accounts from volunteers about the work they are doing in the community and their own interactions with the people the programmes have been designed to help, complete with photos and accounts of challenges faced along the way. Supporters will be able to see first-hand how their support is changing people’s lives, with feedback being welcomed.
For example, a recent project involved the building of a meditation room for the use of tribal mothers and their children living at Chiang Mai’s Wildflower Home after escaping from abusive and violent situations. The spiral-shaped structure, built with glass bottles and mud, was designed by Melissa Kit Chow, an artist from Houston, Texas, together with CCT and Michael Thaibinh of Wildflower Home. The aim was to create, using eco-friendly construction methods, a reflection space to use as a refuge during times of difficulty, while also building and strengthening relationships through a single community effort. Construction not only involved the mothers, but also their children, local non-Thai residents, and even tourists from around the world, thus providing a platform for cultural exchange as well as social and political outreach.
The latest project to hit the press at CCT is a children’s book, designed by Suzanne O’Sullivan, and created in collaboration with friends at Freedom House, a non-government funded, non-profit school set up to assist displaced Burmese families in Chiang Mai. Working with a group of Shan children, the project aims to preserve some of the indigenous culture threatened by the Shan peoples’ forced displacement from Burma, while also seeking to tackle the problem of illiteracy – a key issue contributing to the exploitation of this community by employers in Thailand. The book takes traditional Shan stories, as told by the children, and presents them in dual English and Thai translations. Illustrated with the children’s’ paintings, it provides an opportunity for the children and their parents to share stories from their home country with other cultures, and is also a unique and personal learning tool for use in the classroom. Look for it soon in CCT’s up-and-coming online art shop!