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HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]:

HM the King’s appearance brings joy to our hearts

HM King Chulalongkorn the Great

Living newspapers

Chiangmai Biker Association hits the ground running

Chiang Mai’s panda family feature in new photo exhibit

Chiang Mai Tourist Police receive a visit from Australian counterparts

Locally-grown hill tribe Arabica coffee a success story

GMS countries to showcase tourism, trade and culture in Chiang Rai

Yipeng Festival ’09, for the preservation of the cultural and natural environments of Chiang Mai

Yipeng lanterns should be released after 9.30 p.m.

Drug checkpoints during Loy Krathong Festival

An Australian foiled in insurance scam

American rock climber falls to his death

Heavy storm cuts power in Photaram Road

Gang targets women motorcycle riders

Flash floods damage Mae Sariang Highway 108

Japanese registered bikes confiscated by Mae Ping police

 

HM the King’s appearance brings joy to our hearts

Royal doctors report the King’s condition as stable and physically stronger

His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej the Great, the world’s longest-serving monarch appeared in public last Friday for the first time after being hospitalised for more than a month.
Wearing a short-sleeved blue shirt and black trousers, the 81-year-old monarch was seen on national television in a wheelchair at Siriraj Hospital paying homage to the statue of his grandfather HM King Chulalongkorn the Great, revered as one of the greatest kings of Siam who contributed significantly to modernising the kingdom in various aspects including the bureaucracy and infrastructure more than a century ago.
His Majesty also paid respects to statues of his late parents Prince Mahidol of Songkhla and Her Royal Highness Princess Sri Nagarindra, the Princess Mother at the nearby Centennial Pavilion within the hospital compound.
He looked alert and cheerful, much the same as in previous public appearances. He raised his arm to greet the public as he was wheeled through the hospital corridor.
The king’s appearance brought great joy to His subjects waiting to get a glimpse of their beloved monarch. Hundreds of well-wishers shouted, “Long Live the King,” and put their hands together in prayer.
“I am so happy our royal father is better. I hope he leaves the hospital soon because Thailand needs him,” said a teary-eyed 62-year-old retired teacher Wasana Sriboomtham at the hospital.
The Royal Household Bureau issued its 33rd statement Thursday, saying the monarch was recuperating and regaining strength. His overall condition is stable and he is reportedly to have a good appetite and is sleeping normally. A team of physicians continue to provide him with antibiotics and dietary supplements.
The bureau said it would no longer release daily updates regarding His Majesty’s condition unless the condition improves markedly. Doctors have asked the King to remain in hospital so he can fully recover from a lung inflammation.
The disappearance from the public eye of the revered king has caused great concern and was linked to the largest decline in nearly two months in the bourse last Wednesday after rumours circulated among investors of the deterioration in the King’s health.
The management and staff of the Chiang Mai Mail join the people of Thailand in wishing His Majesty the King a speedy recovery. AP/TNA/CMM
 

 

HM King Chulalongkorn the Great

Fond memories of a Great King

On Friday, October 23, the Kingdom of Thailand observed Chulalongkorn Day, commemorating a great king.

The King Rama V monument stands tall in front of Chiang Mai City Hall.

His Majesty King Chulalongkorn the Great (Rama V) was born in 1853, the son of His Majesty King Mongkut (Rama IV) and Her Majesty Queen Thep Sirinthorn. In 1868, He was given the title Duke ‘Meun Phikhartnaresueansurasangkas.’
HM King Chulalongkorn ascended the throne in 1868, with the title ‘Phrabat Somdej Phra Paraminthra Maha Chulalongkorn Bodinthorn Thep Phaya Maha Mongkut Burutsaya Ratanaraj Rawiwong Warut-tapong Saboripatara Wora Khatiyaraj Nikarodom Jaturatana Borom Maha Chakarapaddiraj Sangart Boromtammika Maha Raja Thiraj Boromanat Bopitara Phra Chulachomklao Chao Yoo Hua’.
His Majesty King Chulalongkorn lived with one purpose in his mind and heart: the happiness and well-being of the Siamese people. His Majesty would often dress as a commoner and move among his people with only two or three advisors. In this way, he could find out how his subjects really felt and see what was happening in his Kingdom.
There is one famous story of His Majesty and two counselors who, after a hard day’s travel, stopped at a farmer’s house to ask for a drink of water. Rural hospitality being a hallmark of Thai people, the family asked the three strangers to stay and have food with them. Speaking freely, the farmer and his wife told the strangers of how their life was progressing and what they would like to see done for their village by the ‘Great King who lives in the Palace in Bangkok.’ The farmer’s son noticed that one of the strangers looked familiar. He went and looked at a daguerreotype the family had of the King. Running back to the group, the family learned that they were serving food to the ‘Lord of Life’ in Siam. HM King Chulalongkorn the Great did this often and thus became ‘in touch’ with the needs of the Siamese people.
Another story of the great love and respect happened in 1893. The territory hungry French had formulated a plan to take the Siamese territory of Laos and certain valuable territories on the Eastern Seaboard which produced precious rubies and sapphires.
In a carefully formulated plan, a French warship entered the Chao Phraya River. It was required by international law that all foreign ships fly their colors when entering the waters of another sovereign country. The French deliberately did not do this. When hailed by the river guard to fly their colors, the French ignored the guard. The guard fired a warning shot over the French ship’s bow.
The French Embassy in Bangkok was prepared in advance to carry out the plan. Bringing a letter sent from France months before the incident, it stated that Siam had performed an act of aggression on the French and must pay huge reparations.
The French were not prepared for what happened next. Hearing of the huge demands, Siamese both wealthy and poor brought cartloads of jewels, precious metals and every valuable possible to the Royal Palace and offered it to His Majesty to keep the French out of Siam.
The French had not imagined that Siam was so wealthy and the people so devoted to their King.
Siam was able to pay the reparations but the French, deciding this was not enough, took all Siamese territory east of the Mekong River.
His Majesty King Chulalongkorn was wise, knowing that Siam could not resist the French and British and held the motto of ‘giving up some so as not to lose all.’
Siam lost over 160,000 sq. kilometers of territory to the French and British.
His Majesty King Chulalongkorn was the first Siamese monarch to visit the West. He believed in adopting all things good from the West while Siam kept its culture. The wise King Chulalongkorn made Russia a strong ally of Siam to counteract the British and French influence in SE Asia. He followed the Chinese concept of ‘have strong allies but make sure their borders are far away.’
Many of the Royal Princes were sent to study in Russia. In His letters to His sons, HM King Chulalongkorn wisely warned them ‘do not feel that you are important because you are a prince. In Siam, there are many princes, whereas in Russia there are few. Do the best you can at your studies and that is enough.’
HM King Chulalongkorn’s most noteworthy achievement in Siam was the abolition of slavery. He did not do this in a haphazard manner as it was done in other countries. He devised a complex method of ‘freeing’ slaves so that older ones would not be left in poverty with no place to live. Younger slaves were to be released by ‘stages’, responsibility falling to the owner to see that they had a way of supporting themselves.
His Majesty King Chulalongkorn the Great is beloved of Thai people and considered a truly ‘enlightened’ ruler among historians. His Majesty died on October 23, 1910, after the second longest reign in the history of the Thai nation.
He is remembered and loved by the Thai people and the date of his death is commemorated every year. Ceremonies are held, offerings are made to his memory and the entire student body from the university that bears his name perform obeisance before his statue.
Locally, city officials, people from the business community, members from local charitable organizations, the private sector and many local residents assembled in the morning in the field in front of Chiang Mai City Hall to celebrate this Remembrance Day for King Rama V, all paying homage to one of the greatest and most highly revered Kings of Thailand. Each organization and institute presented wreaths to the King Rama V statue.
Would that all countries were so lucky to have one such enlightened ruler in their collective histories.


Living newspapers

By Dr . Iain Corness
There is a tendency to look upon a newspaper as several pages of processed dead trees with ink embossing describing items of “news”. That concept is incorrect.
However, newspapers themselves are not something ‘new’. Newspapers have been around for centuries. It is accepted that the first newspaper was printed in 1605 and the first English language edition in 1620. That makes your Chiang Mai Mail a veritable infant, having first been published in 2002.
But back to the dead trees. Any newspaper, and that includes this one, is not a dead object, but has a life of its own. It reflects the needs of any society, and as those needs are constantly changing, due to many factors, then the newspaper must change with those needs. As the society lives and evolves, so does the newspaper.
If we take Wikipedia as reflecting public opinion, we are told that, “A newspaper is a publication containing news, information, and advertising. General-interest newspapers often feature articles on political events, crime, business, art/entertainment, society and sports. Most traditional papers also feature an editorial page containing columns that express the personal opinions of writers.” A hefty task, but does sound as if Chiang Mai Mail is not all that far off target.
Of course, it may sometimes be difficult to respond to change, or the response comes too late, or the newspaper becomes too set in its ways, in its modus operandi. This requires editorial staff remaining acutely aware of “now” as opposed to “then”. Also a hefty task.
Having recognized these factors, this is why Chiang Mai Mail, for its seventh anniversary, promises you a constantly evolving future, with a newspaper reflecting all sections of the Chiang Mai society. It is not a publication for certain ‘cliques’ but one that should have something for everyone.
We are sufficiently realistic to know that there is no one thing that can be all things for all people, but we can try to have some thing for the majority of people, and that is you, gentle reader.
Welcome to the Chiang Mai Mail’s eighth year. We are excited by the changing future. We just hope you are as well.


Chiangmai Biker Association hits the ground running

Chiang Mai’s Governor Amornpan Nimanant (middle on the back row) pictured with the presidents of 15 clubs of bikers in Chiang Mai that are united in the Chiangmai Biker Association.

Supoj Thiamyoj
The Chiangmai Biker Association (CBA) was officially introduced to the Chiang Mai public on October 11 at 5:00 p.m. at Lan Charng in the Imperial Mae Ping Hotel. The introductory event was presided over by Amornpan Nimanant, Chiang Mai’s Governor, Gen. Sangkom Chantaratam, the association’s consultant, and Kankanit Chaichankanit, the president of the association, and was attended by approximately 300 members of the association.
Chaichankanit said that the CBA was founded to encourage cooperation among the members of 15 biker clubs in Chiang Mai, in particular relating to social and benevolent activities in Chiang Mai and the nearby provinces. The association has already initiated useful projects and participated in beneficial events held in Chiang Mai since its establishment, including a tree-planting event, a project for the restoration of temples, and parades for the promotion of Chiang Mai’s festivals.
The president assured everyone present that his association would continue to organize as well as take part in productive and beneficial activities for the public.

The pictures at the introductory event of the Chiangmai Biker Association held at Imperial Mae Ping Hotel on October 11.


Chiang Mai’s panda family feature in new photo exhibit

Chiang Mai Zoo’s Director, Thanapath Pongpamorn (black jacket), receives a cheque for 336,537.50 baht from a representative of Kirin Beverage to support the panda research project in Thailand.

Don Methapiwat
Chiang Mai Zoo’s Director, Thanapath Pongpamorn, presided over the opening of a photo exhibition on October 12, featuring 60 frames that record the lives of giant pandas Chuang Chuang and Lin Hui since their arrival at the Chiang Mai International Airport in 2003, and Lhin Ping since its birth this year.
According to Pongpamorn, Chiang Mai Zoo earns approx. 50 million baht per month from direct public interest in the panda family. The zoo is planning to archive the artificial insemination for the panda twins within the remaining period of 4 years in which they are allowed to stay in Thailand and a permanent panda research center is to be established in the long term.
The photographic exhibition can be viewed at the Chiang Mai Zoo until the end of October and copies of all the photographs are available for purchase with the proceeds going to the fund for Thailand’s panda research project.


Chiang Mai Tourist Police receive a visit from Australian counterparts

Pol. Lt. Col. Yutsit Boonklam, the Inspector of Chiang Mai Tourist Police (2nd from left, front row), receives an honorary shield from Mark Mckiernan (3rd left front row), Scot Kennedy (4th left front row) and Kittipop Jairin (2nd right back row), all representatives of the Australian Federal Police in Thailand.

Supoj Thiamyoj
Representatives of the Australian Federal Police from the Australian Embassy in Bangkok, consisting of Mark Mckiernan, the Senior Liaison Officer, Scot Kennedy, the Liaison Officer, and Kittipop Jairin, the Investigation Assistant, recently paid a visit to the Chiang Mai Tourist Police station on October 19.
They were welcomed by Pol. Lt. Col. Yutsit Boonklam, the Inspector of Chiang Mai Tourist Police who received an honorary shield from the Australian contingent in appreciation of the Chiang Mai Tourist Police’s assistance and support to the Australian Federal Police in Thailand.


Locally-grown hill tribe Arabica coffee a success story

CMM reporters
In the provinces of Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai and Mae Hong Son production of Arabica coffee has been growing steadily since its introduction in 2005, with production this year expected to reach 74,850 bags of the aromatic beans.
Although only a small percentage of the total coffee produced in Thailand, some 890,000 bags, the ‘hill tribe coffee’, as it is marketed, is aimed at the premium speciality coffee market both at home and for export. Awareness of and demand for the brand has been stimulated by tourism in the region; with a large number of coffee bushes still to reach maturity, it is expected that the sector will develop into a profitable, if small-scale, industry.


GMS countries to showcase tourism, trade and culture in Chiang Rai

CMM reporters
The 6 countries that form the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS), namely Cambodia, China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam, have been invited to take part in a 15th grand regional fair to be held in Chiang Rai to help boost trade, tourism, and cultural ties.
Chiang Rai governor Sumeth Saengnimnual says the event will be held from December 8-15 at the old Chiang Rai airport (Wing 416) and will provide an ideal opportunity for all the nations taking part to further cooperation amongst themselves and boost the regional economy, especially during the high tourist season.
The 7-day event will feature many various activities including stage shows and performances. These activities will be divided into several categories including an exchange on arts and cultures, goods and products on display and sales, kad mua, mixed/ busy markets, One Tambon On e Product (OTOP products), Royal Project exhibition, a motor show, and lastly a joint seminar on economic development by the 6 GMS countries.
Sompong Kulwong, the Chiang Rai mayor, has announced that a grand opening ceremony for the fair will be held on December 8, beginning with a magnificent parade representing the 6 GMS countries involved, and moving from Nalai Road to the fair ground area. From 8.30 -9.30 p.m. during the period December 8 -11, the fair will feature the various nightly entertainment shows and performances designed to showcase the different arts and cultures of the nations making up the sub region.


Yipeng Festival ’09, for the preservation of the cultural and natural environments of Chiang Mai

Staff reporters
Chiang Mai will celebrate its largest Yipeng festival this year. This was the proud boast of the Office of Tourism and Sports of Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai Provincial Administrative Organization, Chiang Mai Municipality and the Chiang Mai Tourism Business Association.
Yipeng Festival will run between October 31 and November 3, with the theme being the preservation of nature and air and reducing water pollution and the preservation of the art and culture of Chiang Mai.
Chiang Mai Governor Amornpan Nimanant, wants the preservation of nature and cultural heritage and the Lanna traditional lifestyle, including the cultural tradition of “Long Sapao” using natural materials such as trunks and leaves of banana, papaya or bamboo, done in the past during the Yipeng Festival for the purposes of family bonding and merit-making. Residents and tourists are encouraged to hang Lanna style lanterns instead of releasing them into the sky, in support of the campaign to save the earth and reduce air pollution, and will be the highlight of Chiang Mai Yipeng Festival 2009.
In addition to the “Kratongs” parade, the contests and fireworks, the tourists and residents will witness the decorated “King Prajadhipok Cultural Road”. All these activities are funded by the Chiang Mai Provincial Administrative Organization.
According to Boonlert Buranupakorn, the president of Chiang Mai Provincial Administrative Organization, the “King Prajadhipok Cultural Road” is organized with the aim of designating Chiang Mai as the center of Lanna heritage, and to establish Chiang Mai as a world travel destination.
Sarawut Saetiaw, the president of the Chiang Mai Tourism Association, said his association has been assigned the responsibility of the “King Prajadhipok Cultural Road” and will decorate the road, from Chang Phuak Gate, Three Kings Monument to Chiang Mai Gate, with 20,000 Lanna style lanterns, with the largest and most beautiful “Kom Pad” or rotating lantern and arches.
The Yipeng Festival is to take place between October 31 and November 3, starting at 6 p.m. each night with free tours along the road provided by the Chiang Mai Night Safari’s shuttle buses.


Yipeng lanterns should be released after 9.30 p.m.

Supoj Thiamyoj
Pol. Capt. Prapawat Prasertsuwan, Executive Vice President of Chiang Mai International Airport, at the weekly press conference, requested cooperation from government organizations, educational institutions, local administrative organizations and the communities not to adversely affect air traffic through the release of Yipeng lanterns.

Pol. Capt. Prapawat Prasertsuwan, Executive Vice President of Chiang Mai International Airport
The Department of Civil Aviation requested that Yipeng lanterns not be released until after 9.30 p.m., and the details about these activities should be given Chiang Mai International Airport on 053-922274, so that the pilots could be warned to avoid the areas from which the lanterns are released, just in case they did not see them.
At the moment, there are 11 flights from four airlines scheduled to arrive after 8 p.m. at Chiang Mai International Airport, but the Department of Civil Aviation will arrange for all the flights to arrive at the airport before 9.30 p.m. during the Yipeng Festival period.
To show the magnitude of the problem, in 2007, 1,161 lanterns fell into the area of Chiang Mai International Airport. In 2008, the number of lanterns decreased to only 365 lanterns, through the good cooperation among the different sectors in the province.


Drug checkpoints during Loy Krathong Festival

Pol. Lt. Gen. Somkid Boonthanom, the commissioner of Provincial Police Region 5 has asked for tight control at 40 permanent checkpoints around Thailand’s border area to counter drug trafficking into internal areas of Chiang Mai during the period of Loy Krathong Festival.
As the drug trafficking gangs might try and sneak in with the big crowd of tourists coming into Chiang Mai during the Loy Krathong Festival he has commanded that the police officers set up temporary checkpoints in addition to the 40 permanent checkpoints around the area.
He also added that more young people aged between seven and 18 have been arrested for drugs, especially the children in border districts who have been tricked into becoming drug users and drug dealers and then used for drug trafficking.
The police region 5 has organized a project against drug use, emphasizing on the community’s support to protect their children. As part of the project, the police officers are sent to give lectures on the topics of drugs and look for clues that might lead to drug gangs. (PRD Chiang Mai)


An Australian foiled in insurance scam

CMM Reporters   
David Conomos, a 23-year-old Australian, went to the Chiang Mai Tourist Police Office in the morning of October 9, and reported the theft of his belongings. These included a white Apple computer with additional hardware, a brown wallet with a Mastercard credit card and two Visa credit cards, a Panasonic camera, a black Nokia mobile phone, some books and sundry other goods.
However, early in the afternoon, the Tourist Police, led by Pol. Col. Wirapong Putsarangsi, the Superintendent, went to his hotel room looking for clues, but instead, they found all the so-called missing items.
Conomos did not thank the police for “finding” his “stolen” goods, but then confessed that he lied about being robbed as he wanted to obtain compensation money from the insurance company.
The tourist police sent him to Muang District Police Station for prosecution. The insurance company should be very pleased, even if Mr. Conomos is not.


American rock climber falls to his death

Supoj Thiamyoj
The body of Jeremy Joe Riveira, a 30-year-old American who was residing at BMP residence in Chiang Mai’s Muang district, was found at the base of a cave in the popular rock climbing area, 800 meters from the Chiang Mai – San Kamphaeng Hot Springs road.
Josh Morris, the owner of Chiang Mai Rock Climbing Adventures and an expert on rock climbing said that he presumed that the dead tourist practiced the free solo style, which is a very dangerous style of a rock climbing as the climber does not use rope or other safety equipment. It is believed that the deceased climber would have lost a hand-hold and fell the 200 meters through the roof of the cave and would have died on impact.
The retrieval team had to climb to the peak of the cliff, and rappel down 200 meters to the bottom of the cave through the hole on top of its roof. Alongside the body was a digital camera on a tripod in recording mode.
The dead body was later identified as Riveira and the police presume that he died the day before he was found. 
The body was sent for autopsy at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, and his death was also reported to the US Consulate in Chiang Mai.


Heavy storm cuts power in Photaram Road

Peter Dawson
A short but very heavy storm, preceded by high winds, occurred in and around Photaram Road, near Wat Ched Yot, on Monday evening, October 19.

Photaram Road, 7.00 a.m. Tuesday, 20th October.
The wind brought down the top braches of some tall trees which fell onto power cables underneath, resulting in the total collapse of four supporting posts. One post caused some damage to a neighbouring house and it was fortunate that there were no passing vehicles at the time.
Power to the surrounding area was cut off at 6 p.m., but prompt work by electricity repair teams restored electricity to many of the affected houses with the hour.

Photaram Road, 5.00 p.m. Tuesday, 20th October.

Daylight the next day revealed the extent of the damage and traffic was diverted to adjacent soi’s. A team of workers with three mobile cranes commenced repairs to the damage shortly after 7 a.m. and had restored power to all the affected buildings by 5 p.m. in the afternoon when Photaram Road was re-opened to traffic.


Gang targets women motorcycle riders

The four miscreants are made to line up by Chiang Mai Provincial Police.

Nopniwat Krailerg
Members of a gang of young hoodlums have been arrested by the Chiang Mai Provincial Police. Pol. Col. Panudet Boonrueng, the Deputy Commander of Chiang Mai Provincial Police, paraded Kirati Poomkong or Benz, 18, a Mahasarakham resident; Abew Muetae or Biaw, 22, a Chiang Mai resident of Hmong descent; Ati Mayeur or Lha, 22, a Chiang Rai resident and Mongpong or Jai, 24, a Burmese.
They were arrested in possession of two Honda motorcycles, mobile phones, pawn tickets for mobile phones, a helmet, and a 12 inch knife used in the crimes. They admitted to charges of rape and theft.
According to Pol. Col. Panudet Boonrueng, the Deputy Commander of Chiang Mai Provincial Police, the gang admitted to nine robberies and one rape during September and October: theft and rape in the area in San Phi Suea sub-district; theft of a mobile phone and 700 baht cash at Waroros Market; theft of cash and a portable MP4 music player at Tha Pae Gate; theft of a mobile phone and cash at Ka Chao Market in San Phi Suea sub-district; theft of a mobile phone and 14,000 baht cash at a location near Mae Rim Police Station; theft of a mobile phone and 2,500 baht cash at Nong Hoy Market; theft of 2,000 baht cash at Kam Thiang Market; theft of 700 baht cash at Louis Intersection in San Kamphaeng district; and another theft in the area near Chiang Mai Provincial Electricity Authority Office. All the victims were female motorcyclists.
The police are still tracking the other four members of this criminal gang including Tommue Chado, Boy, Tualek and Bank. It should not be long before the police apprehend the hoodlums as they have done very little to hide their trail. However, the sooner these criminals are removed from the streets of Chiang Mai, the better it will be for everyone.


Flash floods damage Mae Sariang Highway 108

Khajohn Boonpath
The route between Mae Hong Son’s Mae Sariang district and Chiang Mai’s Hod district is served by Highway 108. Flash floods have damaged this highway, and the Department of Highways estimates that the repair would require three days. Mae Hong Son’s Governor Kamthorn Thavornsathit wishes to inform tourists and the people who need to travel to Mae Hong Son to use Highway 1095 instead.
The damage to the Highway 108 was caused by flash floods occurring at Km 13 from Mae Sariang district and about 25 meters of the highway were swept away, so strong was the flooding. Road working equipment has been sent to the area and repairs are continuing.
It is important that the repairs are expedited quickly, as more tourists from Bangkok Metropolitan Area are coming to Pai and Pang Ma Pha, as the climate in the two districts is becoming cooler.
While Chiang Mai and Mae Hong Son residents can use Highway 1095, the damage has caused problems for the residents in Sop Moei district and Mae La Noi district going to Chiang Mai, as they are forced to travel an additional distance of 200 km.


Japanese registered bikes confiscated by Mae Ping police

Mae Ping Police inspect the Japanese plated motorcycles which are being discovered in increasing numbers in Chiang Mai province.

Nopniwat Krailerg
With the theft of motorcycles increasing in Chiang Mai province, this has become a headache for the local police force. However, on October 15, Pol. Col. Aksorn Wongyai, the Superintendent of Mae Ping Police Station, sent a team to inspect a suspicious motorcycle repair shop operating without any official business name in the area of Wat Kate sub-district, Muang district. This back street enterprise was operated by Kukiat Naraesilp.
A quick search for registration documents turned up 11 motorcycles with no paperwork. A more detailed look at the motorcycles showed that the same 11 were sporting Japanese license plates. These included one black/green Yamaha Fino motorcycle, one Honda Giorno motorcycle and nine Honda ZX motorcycles.
Anyone who suspects that any of these motorcycles are their property can contact the Vehicle Theft Prevention Center (oxymoron) at Mae Ping Police Station: tel. 053-140-222 to 421. However, if these machines have been directly imported from Japan, this poses another question – how did they get in?