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Tiger farms in Thailand

Reply to ChiangMai supporter letter

Crossing the street is taking a risk

Illegal dumping?

 

Tiger farms in Thailand

To the Editor:
Juxtaposed to the article, “World Bank Wants Tiger Farms Shut” was a picture of monk with a tiger at the Kanchanaburi Temple. The article didn’t make clear if the World Bank was also including this temple, or other temples, or tiger “kingdoms” in their charges of inhumane treatment of tigers. Another interesting angle to pursue would be rumors that the tigers are actually drugged at some of these places. It strikes me as implausible that these tigers could so easily lose their natural aggressive instincts without the help of drugs.
Signed, buzzharshed

 

Reply to ChiangMai supporter letter

As a long-time journalist, I appreciate that replying to ‘critics’ is neither the done thing nor that constructive, especially when the writer appears not to have properly understood the article in question or - possibly in this case (on the evidence of the letter published) - has English as a second language. Still the unknown scribbler, who has not the courtesy to sign a name, deserves a reply if only to be assured that I and other resident farangs believe that Thailand is quite able to look after itself. This ‘paper and my regular column give unfailing support to events, cultural and social in the City and beyond.
What was being constructively criticised was the inadequacy of  so-called service in a service industry. Over use of air conditioning is costly and ecologically wasteful. Changing programme times without notice or cancelling advertised screenings is an insult to potential customers. Keeping audiences waiting 20 minutes after the advertised start time is irritating. These are simple facts and I reserve the right to point out such problems in common with any other paying customer, Thai or visitor.
Sincerely Mark Whitman.


Crossing the street is taking a risk

Dear Editor,
As much as I love Chiang Mai, it would be great if we could get some more of those cross walk red lights in at major points, the Tha Pae gate area would be good. In front of Kad Suan Kaew would be another good spot. It seems that many drivers do actually semi-respect the red lights and at least slow down enough to let people scamper across the street if fast enough, so it can’t hurt to add in a couple more at strategic locations.
Yours, Scampering as fast as I can


Illegal dumping?

Children at play amongst the rubbish piles behind Central KSK.

Dear Editor,
There is an ugly ever growing mound of rubbish in the car park at the back of Central Kad Suan Kaew. It started about a month ago when a small group of people began stripping bamboo into long strips, which seemed fine at the time. But now has progressed to bag upon bag of dumped materials (seems to be old festival remains). I’m guessing the material are being recycled but at a much slower rate than what is being dumped. Day after day the dumped items just lie there. The mess is not contained in any way, and, when there is no one working there, it’s a dirty play haven for kids. I’m sure it’s also a nice playground for rats and other bugs and bacteria.
Can a group of people just decide to create a dumping ground without any permit or permission? Or, is it possible they obtained permission but there are no guidelines, and they can do what they want? Do Thai people just turn a blind eye to this kind of thing? I would like to report the mess, but have no idea who to report it to! Of course, maybe authorities have already been informed, but are doing nothing.
Recycling is commendable, but there are much better ways of going about it than creating an eyesore and environmental hazard. Where are peoples sense of responsibility and consideration?
Yours, Flabbergasted at KSK