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Noise in Chiang Mai

Dear Editor,
I have just come back from a small holiday on the ocean. It was lovely. No sounds of traffic, just waves lapping on the beach. No sounds of obnoxious advertising trucks driving around blaring ear shattering music, just the soft ocean breezes. No second hand junk truck driving around asking if I have an old fan or refrigerator I want to get rid of. No sirens, no horns, and no screeching brakes. It was bliss.
I must admit, I can generally take the big city noise, traffic sounds can blur into the background, the fighter jets passing overhead to do get noticed but they are gone so quickly its hardly a nuisance. But, and this is a very big one, those awful trucks driving around town advertising all sorts of various things, blocking traffic and blaring out the most awful screeches can certainly never be ignored or fade into the background.
Surely there must be some kind of law about these trucks? If not against the noise, what about the obstruction of traffic? Why won’t anyone get rid of these eye and earsores? I doubt anyone is really truly affected by them except with annoyance.
Signed
Deaf in Chiang Mai


Vandalism of nature

Why do people feel they need to damage beautiful places?

Dear Editor,
I am just back for the summer and was visiting all of my favorite spots We were hiking and exploring one of our favorite national parks and sadly came across this vandalism We’ve been coming here every year for years. The people in charge seem to take especially good care of this place and it saddens me to see foreigners deface such pristine nature. The Christian fish symbol among others, is carved into a rock along a waterfall and there were names such as Sarah carved into a nearby tree. I’m obviously upset about it, why do you people deface nature in such a way?
Signed
Very concerned


Pedestrian walkways

Dear Editor
The fearful look on the faces of we pedestrians as we scurry across the pedestrian crosswalk, with a green walk light, is not unfounded. Some vehicles will slow down waiting for me to run, while some, very few, wait patiently until I pass, revving their engines in anticipation and then start up as soon as there is more than a centimetre to spare. Then there are those who refuse to acknowledge my presence and practically run me down as if my very existence is an affront to their vehicle.
I am fearful of the day when some driver who is too busy texting or talking on the phone or just plain doesn’t care strikes me down as I cross on the green light for the cross walk. The police could make a nice little money earner patrolling the crosswalks on busy streets such as Suthep and then fining everyone who didn’t wait until the light was no longer red. I am not convinced it would help long term but it would certainly be better than the nothing at all that they do now.
For those who are fairly fit and not too lazy, an overpass or two wouldn’t go amiss either. Especially at the very dangerous Tha Pae Gate area, as cars and motorbikes come whipping around that curve, foolhardy tourists dash madly to get to the Gate.
Signed
Pedestrian aware


Elections in Chiang Mai

Dear Editor
It seems to local businesses and to those of us who like a tipple every now and then that there have been a plethora of elections lately. And more than a few complaints from my business owning friends who must shutter their doors on a weekend. Apparently, the thinking behind the regulation is that this way no candidates can hold parties to sway voters by offering them unlimited alcohol and also so that people then won’t be voting drunk.
Commendable reasons for sure but are they really effective? Has the government done any studies on the efficacy of this policy versus the economic costs? I wonder if the government would consider setting aside funds for those businesses such as liquor stores and nightclubs that must close down entirely on an election night to help them cover their costs such as wages. Or perhaps they might want to consider the idea one Thai woman friend of mine suggested, to avoid candidates bribing voters with free drinks at parties simply ban those kinds of parties but allow restaurants and bars to sell alcohol. As she pointed out, a drunk is always going to be drunk but it is always possible to stop political parties.
Regards
Not a drunk


Floods and fires

Dear Editor
As we come into the rainy season and fears of landslides and floods increase, I wonder do the people who burn the forests see the connection between that and this? Do they not know that by destroying the watershed, they increase the likelihood of severe mudslides and flooding? Does the province or the country offer education on these things or just the carrot and the stick? Is there even a stick? Or a carrot?
Those of us who live here often wonder if anything goes on other than the annual “we will start a project” campaign? One solution to the burning/flooding cycle is to offer both a carrot and a stick to the adults and increasing education to the children. When the adults get rewarded for the right behavior and see serious punishment for the bad, their behavior will change out of fear of paying huge fines or whatever other punishment comes up. As you educate the children they will learn to not burn because it is wrong, not because they are scared. This kind of policy can work with fires, littering, dog poo in the parks, and many other destructive behaviors.
Regards
Fed up with floods and fires


HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]

Noise in Chiang Mai

Vandalism of nature

Pedestrian walkways

Elections in Chiang Mai

Floods and fires
 

Note: Letters printed herein in no way reflect the opinions of the editors or writers for Chiang Mai Mail, but are unsolicited letters from our readers, expressing their own opinions. No anonymous letters or those without genuine addresses are printed, and, whilst we do not object to the use of a nom de plume, preference will be given to those signed.
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