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CMU, local government and Care for Dogs work to cope with stray dog population

Local government officials, CMU administrators and Care for Dogs staff met at CMU to tackle the growing stray dog population on campus.

By Monica Stewart, Care for Dogs Coordinator
On 29 May, 2013, Care for Dogs (CfD) staff members Antima Khuttiwung and Monica Stewart attended a meeting at Chiang Mai University (CMU). The purpose of the meeting was to address the best way to help the many homeless dogs living on the CMU campus. The approximate 40 attendees at the meeting were comprised of various CMU department heads, the President of the CMU student council, representatives from the Department of Livestock and the Chiang Mai local government.
During the course of the 2 hour meeting, there was a great deal of discussion concerning the best way to handle the homeless dog situation on campus. It was evident that everyone wanted to work together for the best possible solution. Based on the outcome of the meeting a significant plan of action was agreed upon that will contribute towards a positive solution.
The details of the plan are as follows:
Dr. Boy, a veterinarian with the Chiang Mai local government, and staff from the Department of Livestock, will immediately commence with rabies injections for all dogs.
Each department head will complete a survey indicating how many homeless dogs are living in or near their department area.
Following that, Dr. Boy and his staff, with assistance from the Department of Livestock, will begin a sterilization project for all dogs at CMU. For tracking purposes, the dogs will be tattooed.
Immediately after sterilization, CfD will take over with post op wound care and medication. In addition, combined vaccinations (e.g. against distemper and parvovirus), heartworm prevention and deworming meds will be provided free of charge. CfD will keep post op dogs at the shelter for seven days after which time they will be returned to CMU.
We are very pleased with this course of action and are honored to be a part of this joint venture with CMU, the Department of Livestock, and the Chiang Mai local government.


Wai Kru Day at Panyaden School

Students present flowers to teachers and directors at Wai Kru Day. (Photo by Ally Taylor)

Every year at the beginning of the school term, Panyaden School joins students all over Thailand to formally express their appreciation to their teachers on Wai Kru Day. Student MCs began the ceremony on June 6, 2013 by inviting all teachers to the stage, after which student representatives gave a bilingual talk about the meaning of Wai Kru and led the group in the Pa Je Ra song of respect for all the guides and teachers in their lives.
Beautiful flowers (each with a special meaning) lovingly arranged by the students were then presented to each teacher, Head Teachers and Director. Back in their classrooms, the little ones in Nursery and Kindergarten 1 also gave flowers to their homeroom teachers. Student representatives also read their essays entitled “My Teacher” to express their gratitude with promises to continue to try their best at school.

Students make Wai Paan for presentation on Wai Kru Day at Panyaden School.

101 students from Nursery to P6 and 32 teachers took part in the day.
Panyaden is a private bilingual primary school in Hang Dong, Chiang Mai. It aims to deliver a holistic education that integrates Buddhist principles with green awareness and a hybrid curriculum that combines the best of the Thai curriculum and the highly regarded International Primary Curriculum. Our curriculum is taught in both Thai (50%) and English (50%) from Nursery right through to Prathom 6. Each class has a Thai teacher and native-English speaking teacher. The school was established in 2011..


Chiang Mai students won IEYI 2013

Porwares Phrommala and Pannawit Samkeaw, represented both Chiang Mai and Thailand at the IEYI 2013 in Kuala Lumpur last month.

Nopniwat Krailerg
Two students from the Navamindarajudis Payap Chiang Mai School took first place in the 9th International Exhibition for Young Inventors 2013 (IEYI 2013) at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from May 7-13, 2013. The two students, Porwares Phrommala and Pannawit Samkeaw, represented both Chiang Mai and Thailand at the event where they competed against teams from 9 countries. Thailand sent 6 teams and the local kids won four awards in Safety and Help, the International Exhibition for Young Inventors 2013 Best Invention Technology for special needs, Certificate of Award the Gold Medal International Exhibition for Young Inventors 2013 and theLeading Innovation Awards 2013 top score in the International Intellectual Property Network Forum.
The students designed a “magic cane” for elderly and the blind to help them reduce accidents, the cane has a sensor that will set off bells and lights as well as pliers, a flashlight and a horn.


Cultivating green chemists with Earth Care

The Earth Care group was created to inform students about the potential influence they can have on improving the environment not just at Prem, but on a global scale.

By Benjamin Wright (Prem, Grade 11)
Over the past few weeks Prem’s Exploria ‘Earth Care’ group has been looking into sustainable and renewable sources of energy, specifically biodiesel. Biodiesel is a form of diesel fuel manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant grease. It is safe, biodegradable, and produces fewer air pollutants than petroleum-based diesel. The best part of it is that it can also be used in diesel engines - powering vehicles and creating much lower emissions, helping to preserve the environment. Biodiesel is also much safer than petroleum and other fuels as it is non-toxic and biodegrades faster.
Over a two-week period, Earth Care students under the guidance of Khun Te from VSP, have been learning how to make their own biodiesel from the same oil that was used to cook their lunches! Diesel fuel costs are skyrocketing in Thailand at upwards of 40 baht a litre; this low-cost alternative can take 20 litres of ‘free’ used-cooking grease and produce roughly 15 litres of cost-saving bio-diesel.
Using the cooking school as their laboratory, students created usable biodiesel and put it to the test – would it really work? Together they carried a water bottle filled with the translucent liquid over to the adjoining farm field. It was carefully poured into one of the Prem Farm tractors that had been converted to work on their homemade fuel. The moment of truth – the engine started, much to everyone’s delight! The group was given a short ride on the tractor they had helped power as a reward for their hard work before it had to leave to continue its work. There are hopes that the biofuel produced by the farm can power all the machines that cultivate it, making it carbon negative.


HEADLINES [click on headline to view story] :

CMU, local government and Care for Dogs work to cope with stray dog population

Wai Kru Day at Panyaden School

Chiang Mai students won IEYI 2013

Cultivating green chemists with Earth Care