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Education
 

Northern Soodyod sees students compete for chance to represent the North

Students from Non-formal and Informal Education schools cheer on their favorite teams at the Northern Soodyod Competition.

Nopniwat Krailerg
The Northern Regional Institute for Non-Formal and Informal Education (North NFE), Ministry of Education held the “Soodyod NFE” season 2, Northern round competition at Chiang Mai Hall, Central Plaza Chiang Mai Airport on May 14, 2014. The competition gives NFE students the opportunity to show their creative and talented abilities in many types of performances. There was also a performance from “Soodyod NFE” season 1 winner Plengpassorn Ulit, who represented Singburi NFE students and took third place in the First Open Youth European Delphic Games in Russia.
The three winning teams included NF11 team from Phitsanulok, the NF9 team from Sukhothai and the NF7 team from Chiang Rai which will represent the North in the next “Soodyod NFE” season 2; the national rounds which will be held on July 3, 2014 at the IMPACT Arena, Muang Thong Thani.


Visakha Bucha Day - a Traidhos Community celebration

Students, parents, teachers and staff joined together to make merit and to observe Visakha Bucha Day on the Prem Tinsulanonda International School’s “Global Way” on 13 May, 2014. Nine monks from three local temples were invited to conduct the ceremony which honors the birth, enlightenment and death of the Buddha.


Anti-drugs band contest for CMRU’s 90th anniversary

Chiang Mai Rajabhat University is celebrating their 90th anniversary this year with Central Festival Chiang Mai by holding a contest for music bands to showcase anti-drugs music on the 1st floor of Central Festival Chiang Mai recently. The event was opened by Chiang Mai Deputy Governor Charoenrit Sa-nguansat (4th left) and Pornthep Uttakitpaisarn (7 left), Senior Marketing Manager of Central Festival Chiang Mai which gave students an opportunity to showcase their musical talents in public.


Boarding as an anthropological field

By Nina Kaae, MA student in educational anthropology, Aarhus University, Denmark
Told in three parts by Nina, this is the first section on her fieldwork in Chiang Mai with students and the effects of globalisation and the global citizen.
After spending some time at Prem and observing the various nationalities I then used a large world map, a box of pins and a roll of red thread, and asked each boarding student to put a pin in the country that they were from, and that those who had parents from different countries to put a pin in both countries and connect them with the red thread. However it did not take me long to figure out that the task of pinning the country “you are from” was not as easy has I had imagined it to be. A lot of the students did not know where to place their pin or pins.
For the students from Korea, Japan, Bhutan and China, born and raised in one country, the task was easily completed, and the students with parents from two different countries also managed the task, but then it seemed to get more difficult.
A student asked me: “Are you asking which country I was born in or which countries I have lived in?” Another student knew he was from a city in the USA, but he did not know how to find it on the map. Another student helped him by using Google maps to find the right place for his pin. I don’t think I have ever seen a Danish student using Google maps to find out where they are from, so anthropologically this was a great experience.
Several other students were completely bewildered as to where they should place their pins.
Where do you put your pin if you have lived in eight different countries and both of your parents are a mix of two or several nationalities? Where are you really from if your parents are from different countries but you have never lived in either of those countries? Where are you from if all family members were born in different countries and you have lived in four different countries? Where are you from if can can’t remember the order of the countries you lived in, because the list is so long?
Each conversation about pinning the map made me more aware of the diversity among the children. I was keen to know more.
The third part of Nina’s story on Third Culture kids will be in the next issue.


HEADLINES [click on headline to view story] :

Northern Soodyod sees students compete for chance to represent the North

Visakha Bucha Day - a Traidhos Community celebration

Anti-drugs band contest for CMRU’s 90th anniversary

Boarding as an anthropological field