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Vol. XIII No.18 - Sunday September 7, 2014 - Saturday September 20, 2014


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MAIL BAG  [email protected]
 

What is up with the masks?

Dear Editor,
I am quite new to Thailand and have noticed many people wearing surgical masks as they drive around town or work in shops. What is this about? Are these people afraid of getting ill or are they afraid of making other people ill? I am not really sure what is the reasoning behind the masks and thought one of your readers or you may be able to answer this question.
I realize its not the most important thing to wonder or worry about but every time I see someone with a mask I wonder but am too shy to ask.
Signed,
Curious
Editor responds
In the rainy season most likely people will be wearing them because they have colds or work with the general public and hope to avoid contracting colds. In March it is more likely to be due to the annual smoke and smog we get. But, in general, yes it is related to health and a wish to remain healthy.
There is some debate over how effective they are for smoke and smog and most people, especially those with asthma or other respiratory diseases would be better off going to the doctor or hospital for a more heavy duty mask that really filters out particles as a surgical mask will have almost no effect in those kinds of cases.
Shana Kongmun
Managing Editor



Donated books from Korea

Hello, this is one of your readers!
I have some interesting news for you, I went to Chiang Mai National Library2weeks ago and I was surprised when I saw the sign board in front of the National Library. The signboard is in Korean and moreover I heard that some Koreans have donatedbooks for Thai people and some Korean people. Also that they have been donating continuously for 5 years.
It is very impressive I think, I thought your readers should know.
Please see the attached photo.
Thank you always!
Chiang Mai Mail reader


Ice bucket challenges

Dear Editor
I am seeing these ice bucket challenges all over Facebook and while I applaud those who are using this chance to not only raise awareness for a worthy cause (ALS) but also raise funding for it, I am afraid that I will not be taking part in it.
Firstly, I prefer to donate to causes of my choice and not ones that I am forced to donate to because someone poured a bucket of ice water over their heads and then nominated me. Thank you but no thank you. I do donate, and generously, but to causes of my choice. Whilst I agree ALS is a terrible disease and worthy of both the attention and the donations I prefer to make my own choices as to where my money goes.
Secondly, what a terrible waste of a precious resource this is; there are people in countries who would love to have that bucket of water and who have to go to great efforts to get it. If making a video of yourself and a bucket is necessary for you than why not use something other than water? Like sand? And then once you have donated to the ALS fund, donate to a charity that helps people get drinking water as well.
I appreciate that the hype has helped them raise quite a large sum of money and I also appreciate that the hype has raised awareness of what is truly a terrible disease, but I also suspect that many of those who have jumped on the ice bucket bandwagon have only done so because it’s the trendy thing to do, like planking in odd places that hit the world by storm a few years ago. I also suspect that those who are doing it because it is the “in” trendy thing to do are perhaps not donating either. Mostly I suspect they just enjoying getting their faces out there for their 15 minutes of fame.
Signed,
No ice buckets thanks


Parking in disabled locations

Dear Editor,
I am a regular visitor to the Lotus Khamtieng branch and every time I have gone there recently there have been motorbikes parked in the disabled parking areas. It seems that these people consider themselves not able to walk the extra few meters to the motorbike parking lot and so must take over spaces meant for others.
I find this selfish behavior quite sad and to make matters worse, the police had a traffic awareness booth set up in the Tesco the same day. I don’t expect extreme laws or enforcement but a bit of consideration from drivers regarding this kind of thing would be good. In fact consideration on the roads in general would be great.
Signed,
Ashamed of lazy parking


Support a local non-profit

Dear Chiang Mai Mail,
A local non-profit organization in Chiang Mai is up for an award of Who’s Changing the World the Most, hosted by Marie Claire Magazine. It would be great to see Thailand beat the two US companies also competing for this recognition. I work with Daughters Rising and would love to see if there was a way we could re-post this article for the residents of Thailand to vote for Alexa Pham, the founder.
http://www.marieclaire.com/_mobile/world-reports/inspirational-women/who-is-changing-the-world-you-decide?click=list1# pd_a_8272844
Thank you,
Kate


HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]

What is up with the masks?

Donated books from Korea

Ice bucket challenges

Parking in disabled locations

Support a local non-profit

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Note: Letters printed herein in no way reflect the opinions of the editors or writers for Chiang Mai Mail, but are unsolicited letters from our readers, expressing their own opinions. No anonymous letters or those without genuine addresses are printed, and, whilst we do not object to the use of a nom de plume, preference will be given to those signed.
E-mail: [email protected]

 



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