Make Chiangmai Mail | your Homepage | Bookmark

Chiangmai 's First English Language Newspaper

Pattaya Blatt | Pattaya Mail | Pattaya Mail TV

 
Vol. X No.13 - July 1 - July 31, 2011


Home
News
Around Town
Arts - Entertainment
AutoMania
Book Review
Business
Cartoons
Animal Welfare
Birdwatching Tales
Care for Dogs
Community Happenings
Doctor's Consultation
Eating Out
Education
Features
Gardening
Heart to Heart with Hillary
Let’s go to the movies
Life in Chiang Mai
Mail Bag
Money Matters
Music
Our Community
Photography
Sports
Travel & Tourism
Daily Horoscope
About Us
Subscribe
Advertising Rates
Current Movies in
Chiangmai's Cinemas
Classifieds
Back Issues
Find out your Romantic Horoscope Now - Click Here!
Update by Saichon Paewsoongnern
 
 
 
Education
 

The 2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium 2011 will be held in Pattaya, Thailand from August 1 TO 7, 2011.

Khun Ithiphol Khunplume, the Mayor of Pattaya City will Officially Open the 2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium on :
Date : Tuesday, 2 August 2011
Time : 12.00 pm ( Press members to arrive before 11.30 pm )
Venue : Seaboard Ballroom ( 17 Floor )
Hilton Pattaya

The London based Social Enterprise, Humanitarian Affairs United Kingdom has chosen the City of Pattaya to stage the 2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium from August 1 to 7, 2011.

The University Scholars Leadership Symposium is for students in Institutions of Higher Learning; those who would like to understand the issues of global poverty and Be the Change they want to see in this World !

It will bring 320 of the world's most dynamic student activists in the field of sustainable development to this gathering in the City of Pattaya.

The Leadership Symposium 2011 offers a unique opportunity to meet and network with young leaders from all over the world, those who share similar passion in alleviating the plight of the poor in developing countries.

This event sets a new standard for international youth meeting as it will be run by Outstanding College Student Leaders from Selected Universities and it will be the largest and most inspirational gathering of its kind for young people taking place anywhere on Earth in 2011..

At the Symposium, 320 young people from 37 countries such as Argentina, Morocco, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Poland, Brazil, Bolivia, United Kingdom, Japan, China, India, Bhutan, Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, South Korea and many others will have the opportunity to dialogue, propose and formulate sustainable development projects to improve the living conditions of the World Poor.
There will be an experiential learning program for participants to experience the lives of the less fortunate in the host city and to allow participants to have a feel of the disadvantages living within our community.

What Delegates Will Do On Service Day ?
The 320 delegates will involve in 10 community service projects on Thursday, 4 August from 8.30 am to 4.30 pm.

Some of the delegates will bring the Children from Father Ray Home and Pattaya Orphanage for an Outing to the Under World, Open Zoo, Mini Siam and will be holding a party at a KFC Restaurant.

60 delegates will be cooking for 400 poor children and will conduct activities with them. Another group of 30 delegates will learn baking and basket weaving from the girls from Rayong Child and Youth Training Centre.

Others delegates will have the opportunity to experience the life of a disabled person. The activities include sitting on a wheel chair and visiting a convenience store. Delegates will be blind-folded and will experience the life of a visually disabled person. They will move around and try to make drinks while being blind-folded. They will learn to read and write Braille.

So What Do WE Hope to Achieve?
To Impart to Students from Institutions of Higher Learning Worldwide an Awareness of Humanitarian Needs and to Challenge them to Play Their Part to Achieve the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

To Motivate the Next Generation Leaders to be Agents of Change for the World they would like to See.

To Guide the Young Leaders in the implementation of Successful Humanitarian Service Projects to the Global Poor.

Our Focus
We know we can “ Be the Change ” But to do so, we need to understand and have the right skills.

Participants are selected due to their passion to serve the human race but do not have the knowledge yet; the University Scholars Leadership Symposium in Humanitarian Service will be their Answer.

This University Scholars Leadership Symposium will teach delegates exactly what they should know from planning, managing and implementing a successful humanitarian service project in their own local community or around the globe.

The training course is a Knowledge Based Program that allows delegates an insight into the proper planning of a Humanitarian Service Project from Screening of Volunteers to the Successful Project Management on the ground.

Having say that, the Organisers hope participants will walk the talk by rebuilding lives and sending those whom are deprived of their basic education needs.


We would like to invite a press reporter and a photographer to cover any of the event during the event.

If you required to interview a delegate; we are able to arrange it for you.

Please see enclosed program for the 2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium 2011.

We look forward to have your support.

Janice Leong
Executive Director
Cell : 085-2323-234

Released on : 28 July 2011


HEALTH

Chiang Mai schools received accreditation and trained health teachers on the 28th of July, Chiang Mai Mayor Tussanai Buranupakorn presided over the awarding of the certificates the teachers.


2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium 2011 to be held in Pattaya

Khun Ithiphol Khunplume, the Mayor of Pattaya City will officially open the 2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium on Tuesday, 2 August 2011 at noon at the Seaboard Ballroom of the Hilton Hotel Pattaya.

The London based social enterprise, Humanitarian Affairs United Kingdom is holding the 2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium from August 1 to 7, 2011 in Pattaya.

The University Scholars Leadership Symposium is for students in institutions of higher learning; those who would like to understand the issues of global poverty and be the change they want to see in this world !

It will bring 320 of the world's most dynamic student activists in the field of sustainable development to this gathering in the City of Pattaya.

At the Symposium, 320 young people from 37 countries such as Argentina, Morocco, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Poland, Brazil, Bolivia, United Kingdom, Japan, China, India, Bhutan, Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, South Korea and many others will have the opportunity to dialogue, propose and formulate sustainable development projects to improve the living conditions of the world poor.

There will be an experiential learning program for participants to experience the lives of the less fortunate in the host city and to allow participants to have a feel of the disadvantages living within our community.

The 320 delegates will involve in 10 community service projects on Thursday, 4 August from 8.30 am to 4.30 pm. Some of the delegates will bring the Children from Father Ray Home and Pattaya Orphanage for an Outing to the Under World, Open Zoo, Mini Siam and will be holding a party at a KFC Restaurant.

60 delegates will be cooking for 400 poor children and will conduct activities with them. Another group of 30 delegates will learn baking and basket weaving from the girls from Rayong Child and Youth Training Centre.

Others delegates will have the opportunity to experience the life of a disabled person. The activities include sitting on a wheel chair and visiting a convenience store. Delegates will be blind-folded and will experience the life of a visually disabled person. They will move around and try to make drinks while being blind-folded. They will learn to read and write Braille.

This University Scholars Leadership Symposium will teach delegates exactly what they should know from planning, managing and implementing a successful humanitarian service project in their own local community or around the globe.
More information at http://www.universityscholars.org.uk/


Changes afoot at CMU

Chiang Mai Mayor Tussanai Buranupakorn hands out certificates to Chiang Mai kindergarten teachers at a recent seminar.

The Chiang Mai University Council voted on Saturday, July 23 to remove Assoc Prof Dr Nimanong Ngamprapasom from her post as the Dean of the Faculty of Education due protests from students and lecturers.

Additionally, students dressed in black and carrying banners protested against the Dean of the Faculty of Mass Communications, Assoc Prof Dr Kulisara Kriwarakarn, calling for her dismissal after allegations surfaced that the faculty had failed to pass an internal quality assessment. Allegations the Dean denies, noting that the results of the assessment have not been released yet.

CMU president Pongsak Angkasith said that an investigation had been launched into the Dean of Mass Communications but that the results had not yet been returned, adding that he expected to receive the panel’s results from a fact-finding probe into her management performance shortly.


CMU cooperation with Chengdu University continues

Associate Professor Dr. Jakkapan Sirithunyalug, Vice President for International Relations and Alumni Affairs, Chiang Mai University presided over a meeting on the Joint Research Project in the field of E-Tourism together with the School of Foreign Language and Culture, School of Information Science and Technology and School of Fine Arts, Chengdu University, People Republic of China whole and Associate Professor Dr. Annop Pongwat, Dean, International College accompanied welcome researchers from China at Office of the University on July 7, 2011.


PTIS International School students achieve International Award – Silver Medal

Students learned to plot their course during the sailing trip.

By Joy Huss

In a first for PTIS International School, a group of young people has just completed a sailing expedition as part of their International Award (IA), otherwise known as the Duke of Edinburgh Award.

In order to achieve the IA Silver Medal Award the five determined teenagers, from four countries, traveled from Chiang Mai to complete a week-long trip which included a four-day sailing voyage around Phuket’s beautiful Phang Nga Bay. Their sailing mission needed to meet the requirements of the IA’s silver award: an expedition that included planning, training, navigation, and completing an adventurous journey! And that indeed is what they did.

Getting the sails ready for departure.

After meeting their skipper and instructor, Englishman Ian Jones, for the first time they gingerly stepped on board the 47-foot Master Blaster and very quickly learned that teamwork begins immediately.

Their first duty was planning and provisioning the vessel on a budget - this had to be done before leaving port and it was an excellent ice breaker. Following this the Skipper led discussions on voyage options and passage planning. The daily navigational routes were made by the group as a whole and consisted of a variety of trips around the bay and exploration of the local coast, weather conditions being a leading factor sailing amidst Thailand’s rainy season. After setting sail, everyone became a valuable member of the crew taking a full part in sailing and running the vessel. Although none of those on board (apart from the Skipper) had any experience of sailing, the boat felt like home and friendships were formed within a very short time.

Each night the five moored and disembarked from the vessel with all provisions needed to set up camp, and prepared their dinner and breakfast. After an early rise it was back on board, navigation planning, with afternoons of sailing and motoring skills. Learning nautical lingo, preparing lunch in rolling seas, afternoon swims, learning boating knots and taking the helm were just some of the daily challenges shared by all. Nightly camp spots varied from secluded postage-stamp-sized beaches to hillside lookouts over the marina – all adding that extra adventure to the experience.

Some excitement was had by all on Day 4 when a sudden gust of wind unfurled the jib and blew one of our teammates overboard. “Man overboard” skills came immediately in to play and everyone remained cool-headed in this time of challenge!

Students even took turns piloting during their trip around Phang Nga Bay.

Another problem faced the crew when they found out that the wires to the automatic anchorage system had been severed from the gear box when one of the crew held firmly on to the remote control during the flurry of rescuing the man overboard. With an inexperienced crew, rough seas and high winds, manually releasing the anchor was not an option. It was unanimously decided to do a night sail back to the marina - a good eight hours into fifteen knot winds and low tides. Turning the yacht in to a fire-lit sunset, the young crew took turns manning the helm or monitoring the navigational screen to relay sea depths to the Skipper, exemplifying team work at its finest. The final task for this fifteen-hour challenge was sighting and mooring the yacht to a channel buoy at 2:00 am in the dark of night.

The Skipper said he did not believe that anyone had ever circumnavigated Phang Nga Bay in a single day… exhausted, exhilarated, mission accomplished!
A bit weary, the crew spent the last day “putting the yacht to bed” as this was Master Blaster’s last voyage of the season. Swabbing the deck, removing and cleaning the anchor, covering the sails and cleaning the galley were some of the chores that kept them busy most of the day. They were gratefully rewarded with a side trip to the Nai Yang beach for pizza and enjoying a landside view of the sea. The Duke would be very happy with Ice, Lewis, BT, Royanne and Jackie and their achievements. I am sure their memories and new found skills have enriched all of their young lives.


Ajahn Jayasaro gives Dhamma talk at Panyaden School

Ajahn Jayasaro speaks on Buddhism as an education system rather than a belief system. (Photo by Ronnakit N’Kham).

Parents, teachers and guests gathered at Panyaden School on Saturday, July 2 to hear renowned Buddhist monk Ajahn Jayasaro speak on education and Buddhism. (Photo by Ronnakit N’Kham).

By Shana Kongmun

Ajahn Jayasaro is a British born monk that has been resident in Thailand since 1978, in 1979 he ordained as a novice and as a bhikkhu in 1980 with the Venerable Ajahn Cha as his preceptor. He is the spiritual advisor for several schools in addition to Panyaden including Thawsi School in Bangkok.

He visited Panyaden School on Saturday, July 2 to give a dhamma talk in both English and Thai, in which, after 30 years as a practicing Buddhist monk, he is fluent.

Buddhism is not a belief system as is other religions, those in which faith and religion are used synonymously. Rather it is an education system, the Ajahn said. The goal of that education is enlightenment.

He pointed out that everyone is in need of education, both adults and children and that we fulfill ourselves as humans through education. He points out that humans can learn until the end of their lives and told the story of a venerable monk in Phuket who, at the age of 115, discussed learning English.

The difference between Buddhism and the main western religions is that it is human based and teaching is the tool, not dogma. Buddhism has a holistic approach, encompassing every aspect of our lives,” he said.

Panyaden and a few other schools offer education for children based on that system. Development of wise relations with the material and social world, development of skilful means to manage emotions, and erecting, sustaining and maintaining positive emotions and integrating conventional education into that framework is the goal of a Buddhist based education.

He pointed out that there are three kinds of students to be found at the school; pupils, parents and teachers.

“We are all students of life,” Ajahn Jayasaro said, “As teachers we are still learning how to be teachers. As parents we are still learning how to be parents.”

He said that Buddhism’s strong point is practicality, “it does not teach us who we are or what we should be as we know that already. We see a gap between our idea of how we see ourselves and what we think we should be.” Buddhism teaches people how to develop an awareness of how we are right now, in body and mind and that we have the capacity and wisdom to distinguish those aspects which are not open to change and accept that and deal effectively with those areas which can be changed, such as bad habits.

The Ajahn said that in the modern world personality has become worshipped as unique but with a clearer eye we can see the impermanence, that we are not trapped by our past.
He discussed genetic determinism in which many scientists felt our genes determined our fate and pointed out at that studies have now shown that genes do not determine behavior and that we can create situations allow people to flourish.

“The way the brain develops in children is conditioned by things like love, security, and these have a measurable effect on the development of the brain. In this education process, things that may not be considered as academic develop the brain, such as generosity.”
He feels that the cultivation of a love of giving and sharing is an important factor of self esteem. That you prove to yourself you life has meaning, value and an effect every time you do even a small act of kindness.

“In education, teaching a love of giving and sharing in young children is every bit as important as higher thinking skills which will come later on.”

Other important aspects include cultivating a healthy attitude towards the material world, cultivating emotional wisdom and maturity that provides a strong foundation in which intellect and academic skills can be grounded. Creating a sense of safety, trust and kindness in the community helps to contribute to a sense of well-being.

He added that giving children the tools to deal with their emotions in a reasoned manner is an important factor, “Give children the sense that they don’t have to be ruled by their emotions, that there is a middle way but with expression of those feelings. It’s an ideal and not very easy to do, even for adults.”

Finally, Ajahn Jayasaro said that teaching children to distinguish between what you know and what you believe is important as many believe in things that have no basis in fact. He pointed out that children must know that direct experience is different from reasoned belief as an integral part of learning and education.


HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]

The 2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium 2011 will be held in Pattaya, Thailand from August 1 TO 7, 2011.

HEALTH

2nd University Scholars Leadership Symposium 2011 to be held in Pattaya

Changes afoot at CMU

CMU cooperation with Chengdu University continues

PTIS International School students achieve International Award – Silver Medal

Ajahn Jayasaro gives Dhamma talk at Panyaden School
 


 



Chiangmai Mail Publishing Co. Ltd.
189/22 Moo 5, T. Sansai Noi, A. Sansai, Chiang Mai 50210
THAILAND
Tel. 053 852 557, Fax. 053 014 195
Editor: 087 184 8508
E-mail: [email protected]
www.chiangmai-mail.com
Administration: [email protected]
Website & Newsletter Advertising: [email protected]

Copyright © 2004 Chiangmai Mail. All rights reserved.
This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.